Gaming Monitors Guide | PCSPECIALIST

Gaming Monitors Guide

Oussebon

Multiverse Poster
The monitor is probably the most important component in any gaming build – it defines how you experience games and the hardware the PC should have. Overlooking the monitor can be the single biggest bottleneck to your gaming experience.

With recent monitor and graphics card launches, and wider rollout of tech like adaptive sync, there are more options than ever to choose from, and what was once 'high spec' is now mainstream. 1080p (resolution) and 60hz (refresh rate) used to be the universal standard for PC gaming. Now, higher resolutions (1440p) and refresh rates (144hz) are easily doable for a ~£1000 computer.

If you're spending a lot of money on a gaming PC, make sure to get a monitor that lets you appreciate what the hardware is capable of!

There’s no "one-size fits all" buyers’ guide, but hopefully the below suggestions and explanation of specs helps if you need a starting point to approach your shopping:

Picking a ‘class’ of monitor to pair with your PC hardware involves 2 main specs: Resolution, Refresh rate.
Resolution – how many pixels it has: more pixels = more detailed, sharper image. Usually 1080p, 1440p, or 4k.
Refresh rate – how many times the monitor updates per second (hz): 144hz can show more frames per second, and make games look and feel smoother than traditional 60hz. It also reduces input latency.

Work out what resolution and refresh rate best fits your system and your gaming. Or ask the community on the forums. :)

Then decide what size, what kind of panel, and any extra features you want it to have - and you'll be pretty close to your ideal fit!



CONTENTS:

Fuller tech spec explanations (click).

Monitor shopping options (links below):

1080p 144hz (many ~£200, options £150-300 - also 240hz monitors)

1440p 144hz (many ~£400, options £220-£600+)

1440p Ultrawide (~£400+, many £600+)

4k 60hz (many ~£400, options £250-800)

4k 120hz+ (£900-£2000)

1080p 60/75hz (~£100)

1440p 60/75hz (~£200+)

* Where PCS currently stock a monitor I've tried to put (PCS) in front of the monitor's name


1) Monitor names are made up of seemingly-random letters and numbers. Just one letter different can give you an entirely different monitor. E.g. XB271HK (4k 60hz) XB271HU (1440p 144hz)

2) Monitor companies use names like “Predator”, “Strix” etc to club together various gaming monitors. But one Predator monitor is nothing like the next. Different specs, different panel model. Just because you like one Predator, doesn't mean all Predator monitors are what you are looking for

3) Listings on websites can be wrong. E.g. Amazon describes the ASUS XG49VQ as 3840 x 1440 – but it’s 3840 x 1080. It's easy to buy a monitor thinking it's something it's not.

4) Some sites lump customer reviews of different monitor specs together - as if they were the same shirt dyed a different colour. Whereas the monitors are fundamentally different, and made with completely different parts
 
Last edited:

Oussebon

Multiverse Poster
Tech specs explained:
(click the spoiler tags to expand)

Monitors come in all sizes – 24”, 27”, 32”, or even 65” if use your big screen TV with your PC. The size of the monitor makes no difference to your PC – that’s your personal preference only. Your PC does care about the resolution, though.

Resolution is how many pixels the monitor has. The more pixels, the sharper and more detailed the image. But, the more powerful a graphics card you need to run the game at that resolution at playable framerates.

Common resolutions are:
1920 x 1080 - aka 1080p, FHD
2560 x 1440 - aka 1440p, QHD (sometimes WQHD or 2k)
3840 x 2160 - aka 4k, UHD (Ultra HD)
3440 x 1440 - 1440p ultrawide

The first number is how many pixels wide the monitor is, the second how many pixels tall.

You might also see 1080p ultrawide (2560 x 1080, sometimes mislabelled as 1440p ultrawide when it’s not really) and "super ultrawide" (3840x1080 or 5120x1440 pixels) monitors.

You can run a game at a resolution below a monitor’s native resolution – but this isn’t ideal. E.g. you can run a game at 1080p on a 1440p monitor. But it may look worse than if you’d just run it on a 1080p monitor at 1080p

Pixel density is how many pixels per inch on your screen. It affects how sharp the image looks. There’s a degree of personal preference. But a high res on a small screen may not let you appreciate all of the pixels, while some people find (e.g.) 1080p on a 27” screen starts looking a bit ‘stretched’ or "low res" for the size.

The Aspect Ratio is how wide versus how tall a monitor is. Nearly all monitors are 16:9 (16 pixels wide for every 9 pixels high), known as widescreen. A few, perhaps more for office productivity than gaming, will be 16:10. Ultrawide monitors are 21:9. Super Ultrawide is 32:9

Refresh rate is how many times the monitor updates the image per second. For a long while, most monitors were 60hz. Many modern monitors are 144hz. The higher refresh rate can make movement appear smoother as more updates go to your eye every second

And it can also make movement feel smoother and gameplay more responsive by reducing input latency (less time between you inputting an action and it showing up on the screen)

And yes, the “movies are 24 frames per second so that’s all the eye needs” thing is false, because movies have motion blur. :)

Some monitors have multiple refresh rates, where either
- the higher refresh rate is an overclock. e.g. 165hz monitors are often 144hz monitors with 165hz as an OC - same with some 120hz monitors, which are 100hz natively.
- the higher refresh rate is only available via adaptive sync. 75hz monitors are typically 60hz monitors where 75hz is only available when using adaptive sync

Here’s a primer video:

60hz and 144hz are very specific numbers. Your framerate usually won’t be either. Where your PC’s framerate doesn’t match your monitor’s refresh rate, you can get stutter and/or tearing. Tearing is where the screen is showing parts of 2 frames at once.




Stutter can be where a monitor has to show the same image twice because it is refreshing more than there are available images, and can be particularly common with 'vsync'.

Adaptive sync synchronises your monitor's refresh rate to your framerate to eliminate tearing, and to reduce stutter. Also called VRR (Variable Refresh Rate).

There’s almost no reason not to buy a monitor with some form of adaptive sync for a modern gaming setup.

Gsync is an Nvidia-exclusive form of adaptive sync. Requires a piece of proprietary hardware in the monitor, and only works with nvidia GPUs.

Freesync is the AMD branding of adaptive sync. Since 2019, Nvidia have allowed you to enable adaptive sync on their 1000 series and newer graphics cards – in effect, allowing you to use Freesync.

Gsync Compatible is an Nvidia certification where they say they are happy a monitor’s adaptive sync works correctly and to certain advanced standards. But in reality most freesync monitors basically work with adaptive sync with Nvidia GPUs https://www.techspot.com/article/1810-lg-freesync-and-nvidia-geforce/

Important: Nvidia GPUs (currently) only support adaptive sync via DisplayPort. So you need to make sure your monitor also supports adaptive sync via DP. HDMI and DP adaptive sync standards are different, so you can’t get adaptive sync with a DP to HDMI adapter cable. Many freesync monitors support it via both, but be careful as some (especially cheaper ones) take freesync via HDMI only.

Sync range - Freesync only works between certain framerate ranges. on budget, low refresh rate, monitors this is typically 48-75hz. if framerate drops below 48, you lose the sync and are back to a 'normal' monitor experience.

Low Framerate Compensation (LFC) is designed to counter this, though it typically is only available on high refresh monitors due to how it works. It doubles the framerate to maintain the sync. So if your monitor has a freesync 'low' of 48hz, and your fps drops to 47, LFC doubles up the frames to 94. Obviously that doesn't work on a 75hz maximum refresh monitor, so you need a high refresh rate monitor.

You can check Freesync monitor specs here and gsync models here, though the lists don't always include every model...

For how to enable adaptive sync on your Nvidia monitor, see this article.

For further reading:

https://www.rockpapershotgun.com/20...c-vs-g-sync-compatible-what-you-need-to-know/

https://www.tomshardware.com/uk/news/nvidia-gsync-vs-amd-freesync-test-comparison,39042.html

Covers Freesync 2, which isn't very important at the moment, but talks more about LFC and other Freesync technicalities.
https://www.techspot.com/article/1630-freesync-2-explained/

JAN 2020 update:
AMD have refreshed freesync naming - this explains the new brandings / tiers of Freesync:

Input Latency

How quickly the pixels on the monitor update (change colour, so as to give you the next frame).

There’s a video primer here:

But in reality, most mainstream/ decent gaming monitors are likely to have a perfectly acceptable response time. Also manufacturers can “push the envelope” a bit with regards to published response times, so treat with a pinch of salt. If you’re a seriously competitive gamer and response time matters to you, read reviews of the specific model(s) you’re looking at.

There isn't a right or wrong panel type - it's down to your preferences and budget. This article is a full but very accessible read:

https://www.techspot.com/article/1788-display-tech-compared/

TN panels give the fastest response times, while VA and IPS panels can give better colours and viewing angles. But many modern TN panels give a good viewing experience, while modern IPS and VA panels are usually responsive enough for most gamers’ needs.

This video is a good primer on monitor curvature – explaining what 1800R means, etc:


Small (~24”) curved monitors are arguably a bit of a gimmick.

Display connectors – especially HDMI and DP, and which versions of HDMI or DP matter for high resolutions and refresh rates.

See this for a guide to cables:


You’ll generally use display port for gaming monitors and GPUs (especially if you want adaptive sync on your Nvidia GPU – see above!).

But if you plan to use your monitor with a console too, pay careful attention to HDMI versions. K 60hz needs HDMI 2.0. If your console only has HDMI and supports freesync, make sure your monitor also supports freesync via HDMI.

Next gen consoles may need HDMI 2.1 to run 4k 120hz – and few, if any, modern monitors have HDMI 2.1.

In short: plan out what you need, and make sure X will work with Y like you want it :)


HDR
 
Last edited:

Oussebon

Multiverse Poster
1080p 144hz / 240hz

Given 1440p's relative affordability, it's worth looking to see if you can break past 1080p.

If you're on a sub £1k budget, and/or are focusing more on fast paced, competitive shooters and battle royale games, 1080p 144hz certainly still has a role.

240hz is even more niche, though has become more affordable for those where the usage fits.

Some very budget options south of £150 do exist for 144hz:

There is the Element Gaming 24" and the Acer KG241QP (Hardware Unboxed video). Both Freesync. The EG is a VA panel and the Acer TN, so if competitive action is the focus, the Acer will probably be the default choice.

1080p 144hz monitors used to be exclusively TN, but some VA panels and recently even some IPS panels do exist.

Moving into the more mainstream territory at around ~£170+:
AOC C24G1 (24", VA, Freesync) -
(PCS) MSI OPTIX MAG241CPUK (24", VA, Freesync) -
BenQ ZOWIE XL2411P (TN, no adaptive sync)
ASUS VG248QE (24", TN, no adaptive sync)
AOC 24G2 / 24G2U (24", IPS, freesync - the -U variant has a USB hub and speakers) - Hardware Unboxed review,

Then the ~£200-220 range with TN panels:
AOC G2590PX (24", TN, G-Sync Compatible, Freesync - and its cheaper sibling with no height adjust the AOC G2590FX) -
AOC G2460PF (24", TN, Freesync) -


1080p 240hz:
Generally £300+, sometimes cheaper on offer:
Acer KG251QD (24.5", TN, Freesync)
Acer KG271Bbmiipx (27", TN, Freesync)
Dell Alienware AW2518HF (24.5", TN, Freesync)


£400+ 240hz
Professional esports only
Zowie XL2546 (24.5", TN, no adaptive sync)
And the AOC AG251FG, ASUS ROG Swift PG258Q, Dell Alienware AW2518H, all (24.5", TN, gsync)
 
Last edited:

Oussebon

Multiverse Poster
1440p 144hz

1440p 144hz used to for enthusiast gamers only, but with more options on the market and more powerful GPUs available at sensible prices, it is becoming the new mainstream. It's easily possible to get a 1440p high refresh gaming build for £1000 or so:
1000pound1440p144hz.png

Many options here are around the £350-£500 mark. But there are some budget ones, and some even more expensive options too. Most 1440p monitors are 27", though there are 32" 144hz ones (32" ones are mostly curved VA panels).

There are a few categories / clusters of monitors in the 1440p 144hz class:
TN + Freesync (~£350)
IPS + Freesync + "gsync compatible" (~£450-550)
IPS + Gsync (£550-700)
VA + freesync + curved (27" or 32") (£350-450)
TN + gsync (~£400-500)


Budget options:
The most budget option I know of is the Element Gaming 27", very often discounted to £220 (TN, 27") - Bit-tech review

The Acer Nitro VG271UP (IPS, 27") is a relatively inexpensive IPS option, and upgrades on the older VG270UP - rtings review

The Samsung S27R750Q (VA, 27") is currently £250-£350. It has quite a unique stand, that may be an advantage to some. (Rtings review)

NB: if you are shopping around and see the Samsung LC27JG52QQUXEN, it does not have Freesync.

Pixio is usually more available on the other side of the Atlantic, but the Pixio PX7 Prime is currently around £400, being 1440p 144hz, freesync, IPS - which counts as budget for 1440p high refresh IPS...


TN + Freesync:
Some of the least expensive options, though IPS is becoming cheaper and VA panels are similarly priced.
Dell S2719DGF 155hz - PCmonitors.info review, Techspot review, Tom's Hardware review
ASUS MG278Q usually more expensive, and an older model, though is officially "gsync compatible" - Tom's Hardware review
(PCS) AOC Agon AG271QX - Tom's Hardware review, Hexus review, rtings review
(PCS) GB2760QSU-B1 -

IPS + Freesync + Gsync Compatible:
A newer cluster of monitors, 2019 onwards, essentially bringing IPS monitors with adaptive sync to a lower price point than the 'gsync' old guard. Newer panels, some with newer technologies e.g. LG's Nano IPS. Being gsync compatible and freesync, they are arguably more futureproof than gsync monitors as you can switch to an AMD GPU in the future and still use adaptive sync. All with HDR 400.
Asus TUF Gaming VG27AQ - tftcentral review
Gigabyte AORUS AD27QD (also NB the slightly newer FI27Q - apparently gigabyte offer a 0 bright pixel guarantee on both) - pcminitors.info review, tftcentral review
LG 27GL850-B nano IPS - Techspot review, Linus Tech Tips review video, tftcentral review. Includes HDR10
LG 27GL83A-B, IPS, gsync compatible, using the same panel as the LG 27GL850-B, though lacks HDR and the wide colour gamut, but may actually be available in the UK unlike the 27GL850-B.


VA + Freesync 27" + curved

If you find a curved monitor that's 1440p and 144hz, it's almost certainly a VA panel. And most are probably using the same Samsung SVA panel, making them near enough the same thing with different branding. Usually Freesync.
(PCS) MSI Optix MAG271CQR -
(PCS) ASUS ROG Strix XG27VQ -

VA + Freesync 32" + curved
Same comments as 27" ones.
(PCS) MSI Optix MAG322CQRV -
HANNspree HG324QJB -
Acer ED323QURA -
ASUS ROG Strix XG32VQ (HDR 400, Freesync 2)
LG 32GK850F (HDR 400, Freesync 2)

AOC AG322QC4 (Freesync 2 and HDR - a newer model, replacing the older CQ32G1) -
Asus TUF VG32VQ (similar to XG32VQ but brings HDR 400, Freesync 2)

Acer Predator Z321QU (HDR 400, gsync) -


IPS + Gsync
Full gsync - so therefore Nvidia GPU exclusive for adaptive sync. These are an older cadre of monitors, and some people have had bad luck with dead pixels and BLB on these.
(PCS) AOC Agon AG271QG - pcmonitors.info review, Tom's Hardware review, Techpowerup review
(PCS) ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q (a newer model, the PG279QZ, exists since late 2018 but is still not widely available in the UK) - tftcentral review, Tom's hardware review, rtings review
Acer Predator XB271HU / XB271HUbmiprz


TN + gsync
'Full' Gsync, so no adaptive sync on AMD GPUs.
Dell S2716DG -
Acer Predator XB271HUAbmipr -
(PCS) ASUS ROG Swift PG278QR (an update to the older PG278Q) -


24" 1440p 144hz monitors
The range of choice is much, much more limited - 27" is seen as more of a sweet spot for 1440p. If you're limited for space, run through every way of reorganising the space before limiting yourself to 24"!
Acer Predator XB241YU - (~£320, gsync only, TN panel)
AOC AGON AG241QX - (~£320, freesync, TN panel)
AOC AGON AG241QG - (~£400, gsync only, TN panel)
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Oussebon

Multiverse Poster
1440p Ultrawide

This sometimes get labelled as the sweet spot between 4k and 1440p, but is (literally) an extension of 1440p rather than a mid-point between the two. It's 21:9 aspect ratio, and typically 3440 x 1440 resolution. There are ultrawides with 2560 x 1080 resolution, but the uses for these are so niche that we can dispense with those.


Screens are usually 34/35" across, curved due to the extreme width, often with VA panels, sometimes IPS.
Refresh rates are typically 100hz or 120hz.

Budget options ~£350-450
There are some very budget options out there ~£350-£450. VA panels, 100hz, with Freesync
(Element Gaming) EG 35" (no reviews, advert here) which may be similar to the Massdrop Vast - Tom's Hardware review.

34" MSI Optix MAG341CQ - ~£450, 48-100hz freesync range, with LFC. VA panel, apparently by Samsung. - Tom's Hardware review


34" VA panels for ~£600+
Typically: Freesync, 100hz, 48-100hz range, with LFC. Mostly based on the same panel, 1800R curvature.
BenQ EX3501R (AMVA panel, AUO M350QVR01.1) - tftcentral review
AOC Agon AG352UCG (AMVA panel, AUO M350QVR01) - pcmonitors.info review, tftcentral review
ASUS ROG Strix XG35VQ (AMVA panel, AUO M350QVR01.1) pcmonitors.info review
ASUS TUF VG35VQ - (new, no review at the moment, may be a refresh of the XG35VQ with token HDR support)

VA for ~£800
Acer Predator Z35P - Gsync, 100/120hz (AMVA panel, AUO M350QVR01, probably - using different controller, hence gsync) - avforums review


IPS ~£800-£1200

LG 34GK950G
(~£900, gsync, 120hz, 1900R curve, Nano IPS, LG LM340UW5-SSA1) - tftcentral review
(PCS) Asus ROG Swift PG348Q (~£800, gsync, 100hz, 3800R curve, AH-IPS, LG LM340UW2-SSA1) - tftcentral review
Acer Predator X34P (~£900, gsync, 100/120hz, 1900R curve, IPS, model?) - Tom's Hardware review
ASUS ROG Swift PG349Q (~£1100, gsync, 100hz/120hz, 1900R curve, IPS, model?) - Tom's Hardware review
Dell Alienware AW3420DW (~£?, Nano IPS, update to the Alienware AW3418DW. 120hz - 144hz native panel downclocked to 120hz for gsync, seems unavailable in the UK currently. May be same panel as LG 34GK950G?)


200hz, "gsync ultimate", £2000+

ASUS ROG Swift PG35VQ
(AMVA M350QVR01.7) - tftcentral review, techspot review
Acer X35 (AMVA panel, AUO AU Optronics M350QVR01.7) - pcmonitors.info review
 
Last edited:

Oussebon

Multiverse Poster
4k 60hz

4k 60hz is a slightly odd place to be at the moment.

There are quite cheap 4k monitors. The question is, why would you buy a cheap 4k monitor?

If you're gaming at 4k, you need a powerful and quite expensive PC, in which case why did you spend all that money on your gaming experience only use a budget panel with a pretty small variable refresh rate window? If you can just scrape into 4k gaming from the PC hardware side, making sacrifices to get there, and can only afford the cheapest 4k options, perhaps 4k isn't the right fit. 1440p 144hz may be a better value option and will give you more freedom (and cheaper) future GPU upgrades.

While at the high end, the top 4k 60hz option is currently around £800., placing you only £100 off getting a 4k 120hz monitor, which is gsync compatible and probably more futureproof as a purchase.

Oddly, the 'sweet spot' here is probably the Acer Predator XB281HK and XB271HK as they are (depending on the day) £400-500 and support full gsync. Full gsync rules out AMD GPUs, but since AMD currently don't compete in the 2080 Super and 2080 ti end of the market that's less of an issue, and the wider VRR window is highly desirable. But the fact they are gsync exclusive means you won't be using freesync on consoles with them.

A budget 4k monitor might make great sense for gamers playing less GPU-demanding titles, such as certain turn based strategy 4x or city/empire management games. If you can happily run 4k in your specific games off (say) a 2060 Super, you can get a PC for ~£1000, and a monitor for ~£250-350, which is a bit more balanced than a £2k system with a £250 monitor would be.

4k monitors with freesync usually have 40-60hz VRR windows.

Many 4k monitors are 27" though some people find 32" is the sweet spot to let you appreciate the resolution more fully.

Budget 4k, TN, Freesync:
Generally 28" in the £250-300 range, maybe cheaper on a good day.
(PCS) AOC U2879VF 28" -
(PCS) SAMSUNG LU28E570DS/EN -
(PCS) ASUS VP28UQGL 28" (similar budget offering, but has height-adjustable stand) -

Budget 4K, IPS, Freesync:
More typically 27". £300-£400
Acer Nitro VG270Kbmiipx -
LG 27UK600 (and variants, LG 27UK650 which has height adjust and HDR400, and LG 27UK850 same as 650 but with USB C)

32" VA option for ~£450 in the shape of the Samsung LU32H850UMUXEN (U32H850)

4k Gsync:
The 'mid range' options (pricing varies, often £400-£600):
Acer Predator XB281HK (28", TN)
Acer Predator XB271HK (27", IPS)

And at ~£800, Acer Predator XB321HK (32" IPS)
 
Last edited:

Oussebon

Multiverse Poster
4k 120hz+

These monitors are at the very top spec level. Modern GPUs will struggle to push these kinds of framerates in many games without turning down quality settings.

Note that they are not without disadvantages. 144hz is currently only possible by plugging in two DP cables, and taking the refresh rate to 144hz over 120hz can make the image noticeably worse.

These are also first generation products, with not very mature technology, and few options to choose from (gsync models are only 27" monitors or 65" TVs. As well as the price issue, and modern hardware's inability to drive games much above 4k 60hz in many cases, it makes these hard to justify even where you can afford one.

sub £1000 option

XB273K / XB273KP
- Gsync Compatible / freesync, 120/144hz (above 120hz disables adaptive sync), HDR 400 - Techspot review, pcmonitors.info review, tftcentral review
 
Last edited:

Oussebon

Multiverse Poster
1080p 60/75hz

The is budget monitor territory and only really suitable for the most budget of gaming PCs. There are more options than I can count.

Don't buy less than 23/24", as this is something of a sweet spot for 1080p, both for gaming and for work.

If you're spending more than ~£150, you should probably consider a better class of monitor - 1080p 144hz, or 1440p.

Among the hundreds of budget monitors options, there's one standout at £130 - the AOC G2460VQ6. It has Freesync with a huge sync window - 35-75hz via either DP or HDMI - and so supports LFC. That's unheard of for a monitor in this budget range, which might have 48-75hz or even as little as 55-75hz. RPS review. PCS currently sell it.
 
Last edited:

Oussebon

Multiverse Poster
1440p 60/75hz

Like 4k 60hz, this class of monitor sits in a slightly odd place for gamers. Monitors are cheaper than 1440p 144hz, but always buy a huge amount. And the higher refresh ones will support wider adaptive sync windows, including "LFC" (see specs section above).

It might make most sense for those on a tight budget, initially looking at 1080p but open to a step up, who also use the monitor for work/productivity where the extra resolution is a huge boon.

(PCS) AOC Q3279VWFD8 (~£195, 31.5", IPS, Freesync) -
(PCS) AOC Q2778VQE (~£190, 27", TN, Freesync)
(PCS) iiyama Prolite B2791QSU-B1 (~£220, 27", TN, Freesync, height adjustable stand)
iiyama Prolite XUB2792QSU-B1 (~£280, 27", IPS, Freesync, height adjustable stand - or in white as the XUB2792QSU-W1) -

Bearing in mind that cheap 1440p 144hz TN panels can be had for under £300 and IPS ones for ~£350, and the significant advantages of the refresh rate and larger adaptive sync windows, these are arguably more office monitors that also can be used for gaming.
 
Last edited:

Oussebon

Multiverse Poster
There is currently 1 single LG 27GL850-B in stock in the entire UK... though that's 1 more than usual.

And I don't mean the dodgy listings on the Rainforest, I mean a legit one is actually in stock.

Edit: Aaaand - gone..
 
Last edited:

oskarjhk

Member
1080p 144hz / 240hz

Given 1440p's relative affordability, it's worth looking to see if you can break past 1080p.

If you're on a sub £1k budget, and/or are focusing more on fast paced, competitive shooters and battle royale games, 1080p 144hz certainly still has a role.

240hz is even more niche, though has become more affordable for those where the usage fits.

Some very budget options south of £150 do exist for 144hz:

There is the Element Gaming 24" and the Acer KG241QP (Hardware Unboxed video). Both Freesync. The EG is a VA panel and the Acer TN, so if competitive action is the focus, the Acer will probably be the default choice.

1080p 144hz monitors used to be exclusively TN, but some VA panels and recently even some IPS panels do exist.

Moving into the more mainstream territory at around ~£170+:
AOC C24G1 (24", VA, Freesync) -
(PCS) MSI OPTIX MAG241CPUK (24", VA, Freesync) -
BenQ ZOWIE XL2411P (TN, no adaptive sync)
ASUS VG248QE (24", TN, no adaptive sync)
AOC 24G2 / 24G2U (24", IPS, freesync - the -U variant has a USB hub and speakers) - Hardware Unboxed review,

Then the ~£200-220 range with TN panels:
AOC G2590PX (24", TN, G-Sync Compatible, Freesync - and its cheaper sibling with no height adjust the AOC G2590FX) -
AOC G2460PF (24", TN, Freesync) -


1080p 240hz:
Generally £300+, sometimes cheaper on offer:
Acer KG251QD (24.5", TN, Freesync)
Acer KG271Bbmiipx (27", TN, Freesync)
Dell Alienware AW2518HF (24.5", TN, Freesync)


£400+ 240hz
Professional esports only
Zowie XL2546 (24.5", TN, no adaptive sync)
And the AOC AG251FG, ASUS ROG Swift PG258Q, Dell Alienware AW2518H, all (24.5", TN, gsync)

I have a build which uses a 1660s nvidia graphics card and i am trying to find a monitor which is under £200, is in stock, has at least 120hz and has 1ms response rate and i could only find this https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07RMQ5PHX/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A2IZIWNXZQ7JSL&psc=1 (ASUS VG248QG 24" Widescreen TN LED Black Multimedia Monitor (1920x1080/1ms/HDMI/DP/DVI), Black) what do you think of it because right now it seems a little too good to be true.


edit: here's the link to my build (with help from @Scott )

Unique URL to re-configure: https://www.pcspecialist.co.uk/saved-configurations/amd-am4-gen3-pc/rxNqZnbuMw/
 
Last edited:

Dravin

Member
There is currently 1 single LG 27GL850-B in stock in the entire UK... though that's 1 more than usual.

And I don't mean the dodgy listings on the Rainforest, I mean a legit one is actually in stock.

Edit: Aaaand - gone..

I have been struggling to find one, in the end I bought one from Europe. The delivery price? A staggering £8.61. A little more expensive overall than in the UK (that don't have any so easy to offer lower prices) but probably still worth it.

Total price £590
 

PC49laptop

Active member
Good luck on getting monitors, I ordered a LG 32 inch 2 weeks ago on Amazon, said in stock for delivery, BUT since then only change is now says awaiting despatch. It was 100% to be despatched by Amazon. Listing now says to Dispatched from Lithuania!
 

Dravin

Member
Says 3-5 days, and I didn't order off of Amazon, their prices were around £644 for the same monitor, or £450 used from a company that 'just launched' and I didn't really fancy taking the risk of the used monitor being rubbish or the company taking the money and running.
 
Top