General questions

bigmaraippo

Bronze Level Poster
Hey all,

First post here!

Just curious as to whether we are still given all the spare cables, screws etc that would come if you bought each piece individually..

If somebody could shed some light on this I would appreciate it!
 

bigmaraippo

Bronze Level Poster
yes anything that isn't used in the build goes in the welcome pack
I was asking because since I already have an SSD I didnt include one in the custom PC I am going for. Was wondering if I needed to buy sata cables + power cables and screws for it..

Apologies for another newbie question but, would it be a breach of the warrenty if I were to install my own SSD into the pc?
 

JUNI0R

VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
I was asking because since I already have an SSD I didnt include one in the custom PC I am going for. Was wondering if I needed to buy sata cables + power cables and screws for it..

Apologies for another newbie question but, would it be a breach of the warrenty if I were to install my own SSD into the pc?
It really depends how many come with your motherboard and how many sata data cables you need in your spec. And no, it wouldn't void the warranty. They have a pretty great open case warranty which you can find out about here, but here's the snippet that matters
1630536462216.png
 

bigmaraippo

Bronze Level Poster
Hey guys,

PCSpecialist have informed me that it is highly unlikely that they will provide 3080ti founders edition when building a custom pc.

Then went on to mention that the 3080ti's theyre using usually are from the Palit and Zotac designs.

Now for somebody that is new to the scene, what does this mean? especially in the case of one who is not interested in overclocking at all.

Am I at an disadvtange if I had one from the Palit or Zotac editions?

Regards,

Big Mara Ippo
 

Scott

Behold The Ford Mondeo
Moderator
Absolutely nothing to worry about. The FE cards have a bit of a cult following to them, especially with their well received design. The AIB cards are within margin of error though, some a little more powerful... some a little less. For the most part, due to the way the hardware works, there's next to no difference as it's all dependent on cooling and use.
 

SpyderTracks

Bingo Bango Orchestrator
Moderator
Hey guys,

PCSpecialist have informed me that it is highly unlikely that they will provide 3080ti founders edition when building a custom pc.

Then went on to mention that the 3080ti's theyre using usually are from the Palit and Zotac designs.

Now for somebody that is new to the scene, what does this mean? especially in the case of one who is not interested in overclocking at all.

Am I at an disadvtange if I had one from the Palit or Zotac editions?

Regards,

Big Mara Ippo
PCS have never stocked FE's and the FE's are the first model released and highly restricted numbers. They usually sell out within a couple of months. The 3080ti was the most recent release and FE's were gone a long time ago.

Now for somebody that is new to the scene, what does this mean? especially in the case of one who is not interested in overclocking at all.

Am I at an disadvtange if I had one from the Palit or Zotac editions?
The GPU itself, the actual silicon chip, is the same on any model of card you buy. It's either an NVidia chip or an AMD chip. NVidia and AMD both dictate the "reference" board design which all manufacturers have to meet as a minimum

The FE is the model that NVidia themselves design as how they'd like it to be. These are usually more restricted than aftermarket cards in terms of power limit. But they're often made of high quality components as well. The 3000 series FE's are absolutely beautiful cards.

Aftermarket cards are the same primary designed board, but may be put together with different components such as higher quality capacitor designs or VRMs, but the main difference is the cooling and power draw. Aftermarket cards tend to have higher end cooler designs, and are often overclocked out of the box. The higher the clock, the higher the price because most of the components have to be higher rated. That being said though, this series FE cards were incredible with their coolers.

There are loads of aftermarket manufacturers such as Palit, Zotac, Asus, Gigabyte, EVGA, etc etc.

Again, they all use the same GPU chip itself. And there's a minimum spec to board layout that they all have to meet or surpass that's dictated by NVidia.

Palit and Zotac are both reputable brands, their cards will perform at stock around the same as any other brand.
 

bigmaraippo

Bronze Level Poster
PCS have never stocked FE's and the FE's are the first model released and highly restricted numbers. They usually sell out within a couple of months. The 3080ti was the most recent release and FE's were gone a long time ago.


The GPU itself, the actual silicon chip, is the same on any model of card you buy. It's either an NVidia chip or an AMD chip. NVidia and AMD both dictate the "reference" board design which all manufacturers have to meet as a minimum

The FE is the model that NVidia themselves design as how they'd like it to be. These are usually more restricted than aftermarket cards in terms of power limit. But they're often made of high quality components as well. The 3000 series FE's are absolutely beautiful cards.

Aftermarket cards are the same primary designed board, but may be put together with different components such as higher quality capacitor designs or VRMs, but the main difference is the cooling and power draw. Aftermarket cards tend to have higher end cooler designs, and are often overclocked out of the box. The higher the clock, the higher the price because most of the components have to be higher rated. That being said though, this series FE cards were incredible with their coolers.

There are loads of aftermarket manufacturers such as Palit, Zotac, Asus, Gigabyte, EVGA, etc etc.

Again, they all use the same GPU chip itself. And there's a minimum spec to board layout that they all have to meet or surpass that's dictated by NVidia.

Palit and Zotac are both reputable brands, their cards will perform at stock around the same as any other brand.

So the difference in performance is mainly how much power is consumed as well as the cooling can differ from better to worse? Is it something to worry about at all?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

bigmaraippo

Bronze Level Poster
Absolutely nothing to worry about. The FE cards have a bit of a cult following to them, especially with their well received design. The AIB cards are within margin of error though, some a little more powerful... some a little less. For the most part, due to the way the hardware works, there's next to no difference as it's all dependent on cooling and use.

What do you mean by a margin of error? Sorry bro..


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

SpyderTracks

Bingo Bango Orchestrator
Moderator
What do you mean by a margin of error? Sorry bro..


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Literally the difference can be lower one reading and higher the next, so on average it's so close to the same that it's called a margin of error in the fact that there could be other influences affecting the readings like ambient temperature or something.

So the difference in performance is mainly how much power is consumed as well as the cooling can differ from better to worse? Is it something to worry about at all?
What are you finding worrying? When I say difference in performance, even with the top overclocked card that costs over £2000 at retail, the difference between that and a bog standard entry level model would be maybe 5fps at 4k. These days there's very little to gain from overclocking because the GPU itself auto overclocks so efficiently. There's very little headroom to get any real gains anymore. The higher you overclock the more power the silicon requires to achieve those clocks. That's by design of any silicon, it's not anything you need to be worried about, that's what they're supposed to do.
 

bigmaraippo

Bronze Level Poster
Hey all!

Just curious in asking that usually is it fine to amend an order that is at the pre-production phase?

Kind regards,

Big
 

bigmaraippo

Bronze Level Poster
Hey all,

Speaking to PC Specialist, they stated usually they provide the Zotac version of the 3090.

For one who does not overclock or undervolt, is this card any different to the other versions out there? I ask because there is quite a price difference between the default 3090 on PcSpecialist than to the Asus version.
 

bigmaraippo

Bronze Level Poster
Probably no benefit in you situation, and probably of minimal benefit in most other cases.
Can you please have a look at these comparison numbers?


Its comparing the card to the other designs of the gpu. Zotac is the worst one temp wise!
 

AgentCooper

An Absolute Savage
Moderator
Can you please have a look at these comparison numbers?


Its comparing the card to the other designs of the gpu. Zotac is the worst one temp wise!
No it isn’t, the MSI in that table scores higher. And the Zotac is running quieter thanks to the lower RPM of the fans. But it’s irrelevant, really. They’re all operating well within acceptable temperatures for a GPU and perform pretty much the same.
 

bigmaraippo

Bronze Level Poster
No it isn’t, the MSI in that table scores higher. And the Zotac is running quieter thanks to the lower RPM of the fans. But it’s irrelevant, really. They’re all operating well within acceptable temperatures for a GPU and perform pretty much the same.
What temperature region are signs of worry?
 

AgentCooper

An Absolute Savage
Moderator
What temperature region are signs of worry?
I’d only be concerned if I was regularly dipping into the nineties.

But it’s all relative, if you have a case with obstructed airflow and a subpar cooling solution all the components are going to get hot and toasty. If you want to post your full build spec we can cast an eye over it and advise accordingly 🙂👍
 
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