General questions

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ActuallyDenz

Lord of Steam
You really have nothing to worry about.

As a real world example, here's my temps after gaming from the other night:

Capture.JPG


The temperatures are (left to right) current temp, lowest temp and highest temp and were taken maybe 3 or 4 minutes after exiting the game. While gaming my GPU hit a high of 73c degrees which is fine with a thermal limit of around 89c as already stated in the thread. The GPU's memory hit a high of 102 which is 2 degrees above the upper limit of the target temp of 100c, but still below the thermal limit of 110c. I'll admit I was a little concerned, but after a discussion on here and reading around a little, I was reassured. As has been said in this thread, if you're going a little above your target temps, it may shorten the lifespan of the card a little, but I'll have my 5080 long before the card dies!
 

bigmaraippo

Bronze Level Poster
Hey all,

I am sure I have already left a bad impression on the mods here since I last spoke with them! My apologies..

I was just wondering how much mileage can one get out of the 3080ti gaming wise until there is a need to upgrade?

What do you guys predict regarding the 3080ti maintaining 4k with decent fps in the next few years?

WIth the rumoured leaks of the 4000 series and how theyre twice as powerful as the 3000 series, do you think it would be a smart idea not to pay for the overpriced amount that the 3000 series are now and wait for end of next year where hopefully the prices will be closer to the norm?
 

Vajra

Silver Level Poster
I'd say it all depends on your expectations.

Let me tell you a story, I have 4 year old, middle tier laptop which has NVidia1050ti in it and despite very mediocre specs it could still run some of the modern shooters and slightly demanding titles ( games like Total War Warhammer2, Hitman2, Borderlands3 or Witcher3) with stable 60fps but I admit it wasn't always on the highest detail, but not the lowest either.

I was more than happy with what that GPU could achieve. It survived few years of very intense gaming, and we are talking about suspectible to overheating, 4 year old, mid-tier laptop. Unfortunately it has broken down about 2 months ago and the repair is quite costly so I have decided to retire laptop and to get my first ever proper gaming desktop but I was as much happy to play new games on medium/ low settings on my 17 inch screen as I will be to play on high/ultra and 34 inch, but it's all down to expectations.

I think the problem is that you want to buy
"got it all" high end PC which won't be surpassed by anything and won't require any upgrades in next couple of years which simply is not possible as technology changes constantly.

In my personal view 3080 ti is probably going to serve you well for good couple of years(5+ ??) but despite all it's power it's probably going to be outdated at some point anyway (as is the case with all CPUs, GPUs and other components). While you will be able to comfortably play any new game that comes out in next few years, even cheap, next generation cards may have new features which your high end, very expensive but previous generation card won't have so my suggestion would be to either reasonably manage your expectations or start saving lots of money for future updates if you always want to have the access to edge cutting 4k ultra gaming with all the fireworks and newest features.

I wouldn't be counting on lower prices this year as Christmas shopping spree combined with supply shortages could actually have the opposite effect.

If you want to wait till 40 series come out that's up to you but bear in mind there will always be something more powerful on the horizon.
 
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Scott

Behold The Ford Mondeo
Moderator
You want to get yourself on a 4 year plan. It's generally accepted that every 2nd launch is a blinder. The 30xx series was a really good launch so expect around another 3 years until the next really good launch.

Of course it's never that simple, but it's the most cost effective way of doing things. Buy what you need now, adjust the settings as the years go on and then go all out for the next leap.

I don't buy it that the 40xx series is going to be twice as powerful. That's never happened in the history of Nvidia so I can't see it starting now.
 

bigmaraippo

Bronze Level Poster
You want to get yourself on a 4 year plan. It's generally accepted that every 2nd launch is a blinder. The 30xx series was a really good launch so expect around another 3 years until the next really good launch.

Of course it's never that simple, but it's the most cost effective way of doing things. Buy what you need now, adjust the settings as the years go on and then go all out for the next leap.

I don't buy it that the 40xx series is going to be twice as powerful. That's never happened in the history of Nvidia so I can't see it starting now.
Sorry man what do you mean by a blinder? To avoid or its a "banger" lol?
 

ActuallyDenz

Lord of Steam
So in the case of his response, are the 3000 series the blinders? What is meant by every 2nd launch?
Scott means that the 4000 series will probably be only okay, but the next launch after that (5000 series if they carry on with the naming) will be the ones to buy next.
 

scarpa1

Enthusiast
So in the case of his response, are the 3000 series the blinders? What is meant by every 2nd launch?
Yes in terms of the cards themselves being very good, obviously the actual launch of them wasn't great as they didn't make enough available.

Think Scott is saying, generally if the cards are great one year then you would want to miss the next launch, so miss the 4000 and aim for the 5000.
Something like that though I'm not 100% sure when each new series comes out as I'm pretty new to PC stuff having only getting my PC back in November last year with a 3080.
 

bigmaraippo

Bronze Level Poster
Yes in terms of the cards themselves being very good, obviously the actual launch of them wasn't great as they didn't make enough available.

Think Scott is saying, generally if the cards are great one year then you would want to miss the next launch, so miss the 4000 and aim for the 5000.
Something like that though I'm not 100% sure when each new series comes out as I'm pretty new to PC stuff having only getting my PC back in November last year with a 3080.
Im very new to the pc scene and here too!

I got a beating for free from the mods when they schooled me!

Typical Liverpool fan here, always learning and doing things the hard way lol
 

DarTon

Well-known member
I think Nvidia will deliver a big performance jump with Ada Lovelace. That's why the've paid up to get access to the TSMC 5mm process node. They went cheap with Ampere using the Samsung 8mm node. It's allowed AMD to catch up to some degree.

The problem is what will be the realistic yield be on AL102? What foundry constraints will there be on TSMC? If TDP is 450W for a 4090, which means 500W+ on spikes, that's a lot of people upgrade PSUs, lots of heat issues inside case, higher failure rates etc.

I think it's going to look like a big jump, not 100% but big enough. But will anyone be able to buy it? How exactly are they going to scale the production process given that by end 22 it's not clear TSMC foundry capacity will be better. Are we looking at a paper launch of the 4090 in late 2022, but consumers only really be able to buy them at any sensible price in mid to late 23?
 

Scott

Behold The Ford Mondeo
Moderator
I'll be honest, the 4000 series may be the exception that proves the rule. There's a whole ton of if's n but's though. The GPU manufacturers certainly owe the customers something to get excited about after their disastrous stocking issues.

But yeah.... typically Nvidia and other manufacturers know that if they bring out a really good set of cards.... next time they bring out cards they'll be bought regardless of how good they are, purely from the reputation and weight of their last good performance.

It's the easiest way to make money, don't show all your cards.
 

jamiephillips909

VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
My old 1080 lasted me 5 years and was still dealing with games at 1080p pritty well my new 3080 should hopefully last me another 5 years before I think of a gpu change
 

bigmaraippo

Bronze Level Poster
Hey guys, just a quick question regarding the wireless network cards; can somebody tell me the difference between the

INTEL® Wi-Fi 6 AX200 & ASUS PCE-AX58BT 802.11ax + BT 5.0?​


and that why would somebody go for a sound card that is above the standard?

Just a few questions in case I am in the need to upgrade something!
 

SpyderTracks

Bingo Bango Orchestrator
Moderator
Hey guys, just a quick question regarding the wireless network cards; can somebody tell me the difference between the

INTEL® Wi-Fi 6 AX200 & ASUS PCE-AX58BT 802.11ax + BT 5.0?​


and that why would somebody go for a sound card that is above the standard?

Just a few questions in case I am in the need to upgrade something!
The wifi card, really the only difference is ones Intel and ones Asus, you pay a huge premium for Asus stuff for the brand name. But they're both Wifi 6

The only reason you'd go for a gaming soundcard is if you had a really entry level board which had a really poor 2 channel on board soundcard, and you upgraded to a 7.1 kit or something.

Dedicated gaming soundcards aren't really used these days outside of that as on board is just as good.

It depends what your requirements are for the soundcard as well, if it's for Hifi for instance, you wouldn't get a soundcard anyway, you'd get a DAC, if it was audio related to do with recording etc, then you'd use a professional audio interface.

Gaming soundcards are extremely niche and only really relevant for very entry level systems, or old systems that don't have multi channel functionality for 7.1 systems.
 

bigmaraippo

Bronze Level Poster
The wifi card, really the only difference is ones Intel and ones Asus, you pay a huge premium for Asus stuff for the brand name. But they're both Wifi 6

The only reason you'd go for a gaming soundcard is if you had a really entry level board which had a really poor 2 channel on board soundcard, and you upgraded to a 7.1 kit or something.

Dedicated gaming soundcards aren't really used these days outside of that as on board is just as good.

It depends what your requirements are for the soundcard as well, if it's for Hifi for instance, you wouldn't get a soundcard anyway, you'd get a DAC, if it was audio related to do with recording etc, then you'd use a professional audio interface.

Gaming soundcards are extremely niche and only really relevant for very entry level systems, or old systems that don't have multi channel functionality for 7.1 systems.
Thank you for the response!

I was wondering if it is possible that you can help direct me to a motherboard that is for gaming and that also has thunderbolt ports?
 

SpyderTracks

Bingo Bango Orchestrator
Moderator
Thank you for the response!

I was wondering if it is possible that you can help direct me to a motherboard that is for gaming and that also has thunderbolt ports?
I'm sorry, I'm really confused what's going on with this build. Have you already got it or is it still in the queue?
 
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