Machine not running as expected | PCSPECIALIST

Machine not running as expected

dearon

Active member
Hello,

I've had my machine since August 2018 and I've noticed its slowing down quite a lot. I've done the usual processes like defrag regularly, I've also checked for any potential viruses. I dont have many files on my laptop and only a few games I play. It often takes a between 5-10 seconds just to open the start menu and it still lags for a while. Alt tabbing from a game to chrome can take a long time and then chrome will freeze for a while and say not responding. I usually only have Warcraft or Diablo running along side Chrome.

Am I just expecting too much for my current spec?

Specs:
Vyper Series: 15.6" Matte Full HD 45% NTSC LED Widescreen (1920x1080)
Processor i5-8300H CPU @ 2.30GHz
8GB Corsair 2133MHz SODIMM DDR4 (1 x 8GB)
NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 1060 - 6.0GB GDDR5 Video RAM - DirectX® 12.1
1TB SERIAL ATA III 2.5" HARD DRIVE WITH 32MB CACHE (7,200rpm)
 

ubuysa

Moderator
Moderator
Old PC slowdown is almost always the result of the hard drive. It's good that you defrag regularly but that's not the only issue with HDDs.

Check how full the drive is. If it's more than about 75% full then it's too full. The more drive space you use the longer the seek times (the time to move the read/write heads). The bigger the drive capacity the worse this effect becomes, because bigger drives require longer seek times. I don't like to keep any HDD more than 60% to 70% full.

To reduce the amount of data on there you need to do three things - and in this order...

1. Clean out the garbage (temp files, old log files, old memory dumps, even old event logs). The Windows Disk Cleanup' tool does a decent job of this but there are several third party tools that are more thorough (many of them free).

2. Archive or delete files that you don't use regularly or at all. Start with larger files first; so videos that you have watched etc. Either copy them to an external drive or delete them. Work through all your user data archiving/deleting anything you don't use on a regular basis. The HDD in a PC should be used to hold data on which you operate, it's not wise to use it as a data archive.

3. Defrag what's left. The Windows defragger is ok but barely so. It doesn't concatenate free space for example, nor does it let you place regularly used files together. There are many third-party defraggers that do a much better job, some are free. My personal favourite (for many years now) is Ultimate Defrag from DiskTrix. This isn't free but it's the last word in defragmentation. Ultimate Defrag lets you place files an folders where you want them on the drive, so by placing regularly used files and folders together and close to the MFT and by placing little used files in the centre of the drive (on the longer seek tracks) you can massively improve HDD performance. Ultimate Defrag is not free, but at $29.95 it's the best investment you can make in your hard drive.

All that said, for a PC from 2018 that has never had Windows reinstalled it's probably past time for a reinstall. If you've upgraded from one version of Windows 10 to another in place (ie. without doing a clean install) then that could also be contributing to your problem. Upgrade in place should work for all, but it doesn't and many find they have niggly issues afterwards. Another benefit of a reinstall is that it automatically defrags and places the Windows files close together and close to the MFT and that alone massively improves performance.

I would seriously consider a completely clean reinstall of Windows 10. Backup your user data, download the Windows Media Creation Toll, use that to load an 8GB USB stick with bootable installation files for the latest version of Windows and boot that USB stick. Choose a custom install. delete all the system partitions on your drive and click the Next button, the installer will create the correct partition structure and install Windows. When Windows is installed run Windows Update repeatedly until no more updates are found.
 

Bastet

Bronze Level Poster
I would add another RAM stick.
Check for driver updates.
Run SFC & DISM:
SFC /SCANNOW
DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /StartComponentCleanup
DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth
Run disc cleanup & choose to clean system files.

You can also consider a clean install especially if it’s been a while since you last did it.
 

Scott

Moderator
Moderator
I would backup everything and just wipe the drive personally. The difference in performance from that simple routine is night and day.

I used to wipe my drive every couple of months but now, thanks to some optimisation from M$ & the introduction of silly fast M2 drives, I'm up to every year or so.

A conventional drive will absolutely end up on its knees by this point with all the caching that goes on.
 

dearon

Active member
Old PC slowdown is almost always the result of the hard drive. It's good that you defrag regularly but that's not the only issue with HDDs.

Check how full the drive is. If it's more than about 75% full then it's too full. The more drive space you use the longer the seek times (the time to move the read/write heads). The bigger the drive capacity the worse this effect becomes, because bigger drives require longer seek times. I don't like to keep any HDD more than 60% to 70% full.

To reduce the amount of data on there you need to do three things - and in this order...

1. Clean out the garbage (temp files, old log files, old memory dumps, even old event logs). The Windows Disk Cleanup' tool does a decent job of this but there are several third party tools that are more thorough (many of them free).

2. Archive or delete files that you don't use regularly or at all. Start with larger files first; so videos that you have watched etc. Either copy them to an external drive or delete them. Work through all your user data archiving/deleting anything you don't use on a regular basis. The HDD in a PC should be used to hold data on which you operate, it's not wise to use it as a data archive.

3. Defrag what's left. The Windows defragger is ok but barely so. It doesn't concatenate free space for example, nor does it let you place regularly used files together. There are many third-party defraggers that do a much better job, some are free. My personal favourite (for many years now) is Ultimate Defrag from DiskTrix. This isn't free but it's the last word in defragmentation. Ultimate Defrag lets you place files an folders where you want them on the drive, so by placing regularly used files and folders together and close to the MFT and by placing little used files in the centre of the drive (on the longer seek tracks) you can massively improve HDD performance. Ultimate Defrag is not free, but at $29.95 it's the best investment you can make in your hard drive.

All that said, for a PC from 2018 that has never had Windows reinstalled it's probably past time for a reinstall. If you've upgraded from one version of Windows 10 to another in place (ie. without doing a clean install) then that could also be contributing to your problem. Upgrade in place should work for all, but it doesn't and many find they have niggly issues afterwards. Another benefit of a reinstall is that it automatically defrags and places the Windows files close together and close to the MFT and that alone massively improves performance.

I would seriously consider a completely clean reinstall of Windows 10. Backup your user data, download the Windows Media Creation Toll, use that to load an 8GB USB stick with bootable installation files for the latest version of Windows and boot that USB stick. Choose a custom install. delete all the system partitions on your drive and click the Next button, the installer will create the correct partition structure and install Windows. When Windows is installed run Windows Update repeatedly until no more updates are found.
Thank you, my hard drive isnt even 50% full. I have done the disk cleanup and I've downloaded the free version of that softrware for now.

I look into doing a re-install of windows 10 as well.

Thanks again
 

dearon

Active member
I'm looking at adding more RAM. Can anyone advise me on how to go ahead with this?
I took the back off today to clean the fans (wasnt as bad as expected) and found where to add an additional RAM stick. Is it as simple as plugging in a new one? Does it have to be another 8GB Corsair 2133MHz SODIMM DDR4?

I've attached images below of the RAM port.

 

SpyderTracks

Huntsman
Moderator
I'm looking at adding more RAM. Can anyone advise me on how to go ahead with this?
I took the back off today to clean the fans (wasnt as bad as expected) and found where to add an additional RAM stick. Is it as simple as plugging in a new one? Does it have to be another 8GB Corsair 2133MHz SODIMM DDR4?

I've attached images below of the RAM port.

RAM needs to be in paired sticks so you'd have to ditch your current RAM for best performance. You CAN have non paired sticks, but it's very likely they won't be compatible and it will fail to boot. You can tell which model you've currently got by using CPUID


16Gb would be recommended for most gaming
 

SlimCini

Godlike
Jeez dude, get an SSD before you buy anymore ram. Especially if you're going to reinstall windows. Don't go to the bother of reinstalling windows onto a spinning hard drive. Buy yourself an ssd and install that. Even if just a 128gb one which will fit windows on it and a couple of key bits of software with everything else going onto your 7200rpm drive.
 

dearon

Active member
RAM needs to be in paired sticks so you'd have to ditch your current RAM for best performance. You CAN have non paired sticks, but it's very likely they won't be compatible and it will fail to boot. You can tell which model you've currently got by using CPUID


16Gb would be recommended for most gaming
Hi Thnk you for this, I was thinking I could just buy another 8GB Corsair 2133MHz SODIMM DDR4 which is what believe is in my machine currently? or do you think I should just get two new ones to be safe.

Screenshot below of the software you advised me to download
 

Attachments

dearon

Active member
Jeez dude, get an SSD before you buy anymore ram. Especially if you're going to reinstall windows. Don't go to the bother of reinstalling windows onto a spinning hard drive. Buy yourself an ssd and install that. Even if just a 128gb one which will fit windows on it and a couple of key bits of software with everything else going onto your 7200rpm drive.
Any recomendations that would fit my machine?
 

SpyderTracks

Huntsman
Moderator
Hi Thnk you for this, I was thinking I could just buy another 8GB Corsair 2133MHz SODIMM DDR4 which is what believe is in my machine currently? or do you think I should just get two new ones to be safe.

Screenshot below of the software you advised me to download
Yeah, but there will be a million different models of the same RAM manufacturer and specs, that's the point.

You need to be on the SPD tab to get the model number.
 

SpyderTracks

Huntsman
Moderator
Appologies, I'm a novice when it comes to all of this.

As for this SSD would that just be take out the old and install the new?
That part number is the model. Honestly though, it's extremely unlikely you'll find the same model and even if you do, the likelihood is that it won't be compatible. Matched pairs are always the safest choice for stability.

Yes, just remove the current drive and replace it.
 
Top