Replacement battery or a better battery?? | PCSPECIALIST

Replacement battery or a better battery??

khaleeq96

Member
Vyper Series: 15.6" Matte Full HD 144Hz 72% NTSC LED Widescreen (1920x1080)
Processor (CPU)Intel® Core™ i7 Six Core Processor 9750H (2.6GHz, 4.5GHz Turbo)
Memory (RAM)32GB Corsair 2400MHz SODIMM DDR4 (2 x 16GB)
Graphics CardNVIDIA® GeForce® RTX 2070 - 8.0GB GDDR6 Video RAM - DirectX® 12.1
1st M.2 SSD Drive512GB Intel® H10 NVMe SSD + 32GB Intel® Optane™ (upto 2300MB/sR | 1300MB/sW)
Memory Card ReaderIntegrated 3 in 1 Card Reader (SD / SDHC / SDXC)
AC Adaptor1 x 230W AC Adaptor
Power Cable2 x 1 Metre UK Power Cable (Kettle Lead)
BatteryVyper II Series 62WH Lithium Ion Battery
Thermal PasteARCTIC MX-4 EXTREME THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY COMPOUND
Sound Card2 Channel High Def. Audio + THX Spatial Audio
Bluetooth & WirelessGIGABIT LAN & WIRELESS INTEL® Wi-Fi 6 AX200 (2.4 Gbps) + BT 5.0
USB/Thunderbolt Options1 x USB 3.1 PORT (Type C) + 2 x USB 3.1 PORTS + 1 x USB 2.0 PORT

Hi guys, I’ve had the Vyper for just over a year now and I use it for editing and sometimes very light After Effects graphics work. But I’ve seen that my battery wear is 48%! How is this possible that my battery has degraded almost half when it’s only been a year?? I also try and take care of the battery by charging it fully and unplugging once fully charged so it doesn’t over charge. Similarly, I let my battery discharge way below 20% before plugging it back in again.

I wanted to ask if there is any way to get a replacement battery for this, a better one I mean, because I know getting the same one is gonna do the same thing. And that’s certainly not cost-effective since I don’t wanna fork out £80-£90 a year for a new battery.

Any thoughts?
 

Vergaro98

Enthusiast
Vyper Series: 15.6" Matte Full HD 144Hz 72% NTSC LED Widescreen (1920x1080)
Processor (CPU)Intel® Core™ i7 Six Core Processor 9750H (2.6GHz, 4.5GHz Turbo)
Memory (RAM)32GB Corsair 2400MHz SODIMM DDR4 (2 x 16GB)
Graphics CardNVIDIA® GeForce® RTX 2070 - 8.0GB GDDR6 Video RAM - DirectX® 12.1
1st M.2 SSD Drive512GB Intel® H10 NVMe SSD + 32GB Intel® Optane™ (upto 2300MB/sR | 1300MB/sW)
Memory Card ReaderIntegrated 3 in 1 Card Reader (SD / SDHC / SDXC)
AC Adaptor1 x 230W AC Adaptor
Power Cable2 x 1 Metre UK Power Cable (Kettle Lead)
BatteryVyper II Series 62WH Lithium Ion Battery
Thermal PasteARCTIC MX-4 EXTREME THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY COMPOUND
Sound Card2 Channel High Def. Audio + THX Spatial Audio
Bluetooth & WirelessGIGABIT LAN & WIRELESS INTEL® Wi-Fi 6 AX200 (2.4 Gbps) + BT 5.0
USB/Thunderbolt Options1 x USB 3.1 PORT (Type C) + 2 x USB 3.1 PORTS + 1 x USB 2.0 PORT

Hi guys, I’ve had the Vyper for just over a year now and I use it for editing and sometimes very light After Effects graphics work. But I’ve seen that my battery wear is 48%! How is this possible that my battery has degraded almost half when it’s only been a year?? I also try and take care of the battery by charging it fully and unplugging once fully charged so it doesn’t over charge. Similarly, I let my battery discharge way below 20% before plugging it back in again.

I wanted to ask if there is any way to get a replacement battery for this, a better one I mean, because I know getting the same one is gonna do the same thing. And that’s certainly not cost-effective since I don’t wanna fork out £80-£90 a year for a new battery.

Any thoughts?
That's not how to treat a battery 😅. For battery saving you have to put stationary mode on your control center but more importantly for saving battery you have to not discharge the battery under 20% and you shouldn't charge over 80% the opposite that you did.
 

khaleeq96

Member
Oh right. I thought you should let your battery drain almost completely and 20% should be the MINIMUM before plugging in. I see.
Also for the work I do (editing), I need to have it plugged in for as long as I can as it’s much faster. Since the battery itself always charges fully pretty fast to 100%, if I were to do it at 80% and then unplug then I won’t be productive because PC becomes slower.

But anyway, apart from this, is there a different kind of battery or a higher capacity battery that can be purchased?
 

SpyderTracks

Bingo Bango Orchestrator
Moderator
Oh right. I thought you should let your battery drain almost completely and 20% should be the MINIMUM before plugging in. I see.
Also for the work I do (editing), I need to have it plugged in for as long as I can as it’s much faster. Since the battery itself always charges fully pretty fast to 100%, if I were to do it at 80% and then unplug then I won’t be productive because PC becomes slower.

But anyway, apart from this, is there a different kind of battery or a higher capacity battery that can be purchased?
You should be able to order a replacement battery through your online account, in the upgrades section.

I don’t think there are any extended batteries available that I know of.

But yes, you set a limiter to max charge to 80% and leave it plugged in.
 

Vergaro98

Enthusiast
In the control center there's a section called battery. There you have to choose from 3 different battery mode. Stationary mode should keep the battery max at 80% also when plug-in.
 

ubuysa

The BSOD Doctor
Moderator
IMO whilst the "not less than 20% and not more than 80%" guidelines for li-ion batteries is true, the gains will be found much more on large traction batteries such as those used in electric cars. I very much doubt that any gains made in a laptop battery will be worth the effort involved in sticking to a 20% - 80% regime.

No li-ion based laptop will overcharge if left plugged in, the charging circuits already offer the best compromise of battery charge level (and thus life) and run time on battery. There is no harm at all in leaving a li-ion battery plugged in to power all the time. It is certainly true however that (unlike the older nicad batteries) li-ion batteries have no memory and do not need to be regularly discharged fully.

In any case, the one thing that li-ion batteries hate more than anything else is heat, so allowing the battery to get hot will negate any benefits you may have accrued via a 20% - 80% charging regime. The best thing you can do with any li-ion battery is to keep it as cool as you can.
 

khaleeq96

Member
IMO whilst the "not less than 20% and not more than 80%" guidelines for li-ion batteries is true, the gains will be found much more on large traction batteries such as those used in electric cars. I very much doubt that any gains made in a laptop battery will be worth the effort involved in sticking to a 20% - 80% regime.

No li-ion based laptop will overcharge if left plugged in, the charging circuits already offer the best compromise of battery charge level (and thus life) and run time on battery. There is no harm at all in leaving a li-ion battery plugged in to power all the time. It is certainly true however that (unlike the older nicad batteries) li-ion batteries have no memory and do not need to be regularly discharged fully.

In any case, the one thing that li-ion batteries hate more than anything else is heat, so allowing the battery to get hot will negate any benefits you may have accrued via a 20% - 80% charging regime. The best thing you can do with any li-ion battery is to keep it as cool as you can.
So to sum up, you can charge li-ion batteries for as long as you’d like, provided it doesn’t overheat, right?
 

SpyderTracks

Bingo Bango Orchestrator
Moderator
So to sum up, you can charge li-ion batteries for as long as you’d like, provided it doesn’t overheat, right?
They have circuitry in built that disabled charging when it gets to whatever value is hard coded, or whatever value you soft code if that supersedes it.
 
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