RTX 2080 Graphics card stuck on 300 on Octane VI

slippy88

Active member
Screenshot 3 - I realised you can't see the numbers afterwards. The HW Monitor was in game.
This is a new screenshot ingame of Warzone - also added the CPU usage and power limit
 

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SpyderTracks

We love you Ukraine
Moderator
Is there a guide on how to do it for my laptop Octane VI?

How many grams do I need?

Is Thermal Grizzly the ultimate best one I can buy ?
Thermal grizzly is generally recommended. It's the same on any laptop, just remove the heatsink and apply the paste, then put the heatsank back in the correct idlrder of screwpoints.

There are plenty of guides on YouTube.

If you're doing Gou and CPU you'll need the bigger size tube, there are only 2.
 

slippy88

Active member
Thermal grizzly is generally recommended. It's the same on any laptop, just remove the heatsink and apply the paste, then put the heatsank back in the correct idlrder of screwpoints.

There are plenty of guides on YouTube.

If you're doing Gou and CPU you'll need the bigger size tube, there are only 2.
Thanks I will order the stuff in now and give it a go and let you know the results
 

Scott

Behold The Ford Mondeo
Moderator
Remember to remove the old paste too. Don't just put the new paste on top of the old paste. Clean it off with cotton wool and alcohol (I use cheap vodka).

The performance seems fine and it's running as I would expect.... for an overheating system. You can see HWMonitor showing good frequencies on the GPU while under load.
 

barlew

MOST VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
It does look like both GPU and graphics are too hot, you need to start by cleaning and repasting.
Yeh @SpyderTracks is right. The power levels look fine. there is a power limit throttle in one screen shot but i dont think thats your problem. Like Spyder said both your GPU and CPU are getting too hot.
 

DarkPaladin

Silver Level Poster
I read through the posts and your system specifications, and we have the same system minus a different CPU + storage options (8700k vs 9900k).

I can say from experience that my laptop has never had the temperature spikes you're dealing with. The absolute hottest my CPU has been was during Cyberpunk 2077 in the summer, maxing around 95c. My GPU's maximum temperature was around 82c in the same playthrough.

As people have said throughout the post, the issue is more than likely thermal throttling due to the overheating. The GPU + CPU's are designed to throttle themselves when they reach a certain temperature limit. This weakens the potential performance of the system in favour or longevity etc.

It might seem strange, but I'd argue that thermal throttling is the best of the 3 throttles because it's generally easier to deal with. Power Limit + Current Throttling are a pain!

Thankfully, the CLEVO P775TM1-G is actually very good at allowing good cooling due to its size + good quality heatsink.
https://clevo-computer.com/en/clevo-p775tm1-g

In terms of how to reduce the temperatures, you'll want to buy a few items to help with that:
1) Components to remove + clean off the existing paste
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Arctic-Silver-ArctiClean-Material-Purifier/dp/B000BKP306/ref=sr_1_3?crid=3SLCKFL4C1VCH&keywords=arctic+paste+remover&qid=1652280940&sprefix=arctic+paste+remover,aps,249&sr=8-3
2) Thermal paste to reduce temperatures. Just be aware that some people reportedly have issues with the Grizzly Kyronaut drying out over 80c. I personally haven't seen this myself, but it can happen occasionally.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Thermal-Grizzly-Kryonaut-compound-compounds/dp/B00ZJSF5LM/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=thermal+grizzly+kryonaut&qid=1652280978&sprefix=grizzly+kyr,aps,181&sr=8-1
or
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07MZ5GQBM/ref=emc_b_5_t
3) Cotton buds to help remove dust from the tighter spots of the fans. I use the thermal paste purifier from the first link on a cotton bud to help with this part
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Johnsons-C..._5?keywords=cotton+buds&qid=1652281044&sr=8-5
4) This one is optional. I bought this cooling pad a week ago and saw my temperatures drop by 8-10C across the board. Just be aware that it's very noisy and powered by a plug socket. If you're in the UK, you'll also need an EU to UK plug adaptor for it to work.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/IETS-Powerful-Turbo-Fan-Infinitely-13-17-3inch/dp/B09FJBYQ7Y/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=iets+gt500&qid=1652281301&sprefix=iets,aps,271&sr=8-3
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hulkpro-European-Adapter-Toothbrush-Hairdryer/dp/B08S369FN9/ref=sr_1_3?crid=UEMAUDQ8VF5U&keywords=hulkpro+adapter&qid=1652281389&sprefix=hulkpro+,aps,152&sr=8-3

1) As for a guide, removing the screws on the bottom of the case can be done in no particular order. However, it is very important that you remove + re-add the heatsink screws in a specific order. They'll all have a number between 1-9. When removing the screws, start with 9 (middle screw) and end with 1. When re-seating the components, start with 1 and end with 9.
Note: Don't tighten the screws too much or you'll likely end up having them stripped like I unfortunately had to deal with earlier this year.

2) Once you've taken out the screws and need to remove the heatsink, do not pull them off from the pipes. You'll damage it from doing that. The best way is by pulling upwards gently from the black vents.

3) After removing the heatsink, the first task I usually do is applying thermal paste remover on both components + the heatsink itself and letting it do its thing for a minute. Once it's done, gently remove the paste with a paper towel. Then, apply the thermal paste purifier to the same parts for 60 seconds.

4) After this, I'd remove the fans from their place and begin cleaning them. Apply the purifier to a cotton bud and remove as much dust as possible. This part can be tedious and time-consuming, but it's definitely worth doing so.

5) Hold up the heatsink gently from both sides and blow into the black vents to remove dust from them. This part is thankfully fairly straightforward.

6) As for applying the thermal paste, I usually perform the X method on both components as this allows for a fairly even spread of the paste. It's nerve-wrecking at first, but you'll absolutely get used to it. I'd also repeat this task every 3-6 months depending on dust build-up in the fans + heatsink.

7) Once you've re-applied the paste, insert the screws in the correct order from 1-9. This allows the heatsink to have the best + even fit on the top of the components + allows the paste to spread. From memory, screws 1-4 are with the GPU side and screws 5-8 are on the CPU. Screw #9 is between both of them.

8) Re-attach the bottom case with the screws. I don't think it matters which order you do this in, just be sure to remember where each screw was originally placed.

9) Let the paste set for 10-20 minutes, then perform a stress test in Intel XTU. If your laptop is still overheating, I'd consider incrementally undervolting the CPU or re-doing the thermal paste process again. A lot of the time, it's completely trial and error so even someone like myself who has done this 50+ times can still get it wrong.

10) Last pieces of advice would be to turn on your fans to their full speed during gameplay. You do this by pushing Fn + 1 simultaneously. Also, (I'm sure you're doing this already) but make sure the air vents aren't blocked by having it on a blanket etc. You ideally want a cooling pad slightly upward to encourage air flow.

Hopefully this all helps, and good luck with the process!
 
Last edited:

barlew

MOST VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
I read through the posts and your system specifications, and we have the same system minus a different CPU + storage options (8700k vs 9900k).

I can say from experience that my laptop has never had the temperature spikes you're dealing with. The absolute hottest my CPU has been was during Cyberpunk 2077 in the summer, maxing around 95c. My GPU's maximum temperature was around 82c in the same playthrough.

As people have said throughout the post, the issue is more than likely thermal throttling due to the overheating. The GPU + CPU's are designed to throttle themselves when they reach a certain temperature limit. This weakens the potential performance of the system in favour or longevity etc.

It might seem strange, but I'd argue that thermal throttling is the best of the 3 throttles because it's generally easier to deal with. Power Limit + Current Throttling are a pain!

Thankfully, the CLEVO P775TM1-G is actually very good at allowing good cooling due to its size + good quality heatsink.
https://clevo-computer.com/en/clevo-p775tm1-g

In terms of how to reduce the temperatures, you'll want to buy a few items to help with that:
1) Components to remove + clean off the existing paste
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Arctic-Silver-ArctiClean-Material-Purifier/dp/B000BKP306/ref=sr_1_3?crid=3SLCKFL4C1VCH&keywords=arctic+paste+remover&qid=1652280940&sprefix=arctic+paste+remover,aps,249&sr=8-3
2) Thermal paste to reduce temperatures. Just be aware that some people reportedly have issues with the Grizzly Kyronaut drying out over 80c. I personally haven't seen this myself, but it can happen occasionally.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Thermal-Grizzly-Kryonaut-compound-compounds/dp/B00ZJSF5LM/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=thermal+grizzly+kryonaut&qid=1652280978&sprefix=grizzly+kyr,aps,181&sr=8-1
or
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07MZ5GQBM/ref=emc_b_5_t
3) Cotton buds to help remove dust from the tighter spots of the fans. I use the thermal paste purifier from the first link on a cotton bud to help with this part
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Johnsons-C..._5?keywords=cotton+buds&qid=1652281044&sr=8-5
4) This one is optional. I bought this cooling pad a week ago and saw my temperatures drop by 8-10C across the board. Just be aware that it's very noisy and powered by a plug socket. If you're in the UK, you'll also need an EU to UK plug adaptor for it to work.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/IETS-Powerful-Turbo-Fan-Infinitely-13-17-3inch/dp/B09FJBYQ7Y/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=iets+gt500&qid=1652281301&sprefix=iets,aps,271&sr=8-3
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hulkpro-European-Adapter-Toothbrush-Hairdryer/dp/B08S369FN9/ref=sr_1_3?crid=UEMAUDQ8VF5U&keywords=hulkpro+adapter&qid=1652281389&sprefix=hulkpro+,aps,152&sr=8-3

1) As for a guide, removing the screws on the bottom of the case can be done in no particular order. However, it is very important that you remove + re-add the heatsink screws in a specific order. They'll all have a number between 1-9. When removing the screws, start with 9 (middle screw) and end with 1. When re-seating the components, start with 1 and end with 9.
Note: Don't tighten the screws too much or you'll likely end up having them stripped like I unfortunately had to deal with earlier this year.

2) Once you've taken out the screws and need to remove the heatsink, do not pull them off from the pipes. You'll damage it from doing that. The best way is by pulling upwards gently from the black vents.

3) After removing the heatsink, the first task I usually do is applying thermal paste remover on both components + the heatsink itself and letting it do its thing for a minute. Once it's done, gently remove the paste with a paper towel. Then, apply the thermal paste purifier to the same parts for 60 seconds.

4) After this, I'd remove the fans from their place and begin cleaning them. Apply the purifier to a cotton bud and remove as much dust as possible. This part can be tedious and time-consuming, but it's definitely worth doing so.

5) Hold up the heatsink gently from both sides and blow into the black vents to remove dust from them. This part is thankfully fairly straightforward.

6) As for applying the thermal paste, I usually perform the X method on both components as this allows for a fairly even spread of the paste. It's nerve-wrecking at first, but you'll absolutely get used to it. I'd also repeat this task every 3-6 months depending on dust build-up in the fans + heatsink.

7) Once you've re-applied the paste, insert the screws in the correct order from 1-9. This allows the heatsink to have the best + even fit on the top of the components + allows the paste to spread. From memory, screws 1-4 are with the GPU side and screws 5-8 are on the CPU. Screw #9 is between both of them.

8) Re-attach the bottom case with the screws. I don't think it matters which order you do this in, just be sure to remember where each screw was originally placed.

9) Let the paste set for 10-20 minutes, then perform a stress test in Intel XTU. If your laptop is still overheating, I'd consider incrementally undervolting the CPU or re-doing the thermal paste process again. A lot of the time, it's completely trial and error so even someone like myself who has done this 50+ times can still get it wrong.

10) Last pieces of advice would be to turn on your fans to their full speed during gameplay. You do this by pushing Fn + 1 simultaneously. Also, (I'm sure you're doing this already) but make sure the air vents aren't blocked by having it on a blanket etc. You ideally want a cooling pad slightly upward to encourage air flow.

Hopefully this all helps, and good luck with the process!
Kudos on that post mate.
 

slippy88

Active member
I read through the posts and your system specifications, and we have the same system minus a different CPU + storage options (8700k vs 9900k).

I can say from experience that my laptop has never had the temperature spikes you're dealing with. The absolute hottest my CPU has been was during Cyberpunk 2077 in the summer, maxing around 95c. My GPU's maximum temperature was around 82c in the same playthrough.

As people have said throughout the post, the issue is more than likely thermal throttling due to the overheating. The GPU + CPU's are designed to throttle themselves when they reach a certain temperature limit. This weakens the potential performance of the system in favour or longevity etc.

It might seem strange, but I'd argue that thermal throttling is the best of the 3 throttles because it's generally easier to deal with. Power Limit + Current Throttling are a pain!

Thankfully, the CLEVO P775TM1-G is actually very good at allowing good cooling due to its size + good quality heatsink.
https://clevo-computer.com/en/clevo-p775tm1-g

In terms of how to reduce the temperatures, you'll want to buy a few items to help with that:
1) Components to remove + clean off the existing paste
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Arctic-Silver-ArctiClean-Material-Purifier/dp/B000BKP306/ref=sr_1_3?crid=3SLCKFL4C1VCH&keywords=arctic+paste+remover&qid=1652280940&sprefix=arctic+paste+remover,aps,249&sr=8-3
2) Thermal paste to reduce temperatures. Just be aware that some people reportedly have issues with the Grizzly Kyronaut drying out over 80c. I personally haven't seen this myself, but it can happen occasionally.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Thermal-Grizzly-Kryonaut-compound-compounds/dp/B00ZJSF5LM/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=thermal+grizzly+kryonaut&qid=1652280978&sprefix=grizzly+kyr,aps,181&sr=8-1
or
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07MZ5GQBM/ref=emc_b_5_t
3) Cotton buds to help remove dust from the tighter spots of the fans. I use the thermal paste purifier from the first link on a cotton bud to help with this part
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Johnsons-C..._5?keywords=cotton+buds&qid=1652281044&sr=8-5
4) This one is optional. I bought this cooling pad a week ago and saw my temperatures drop by 8-10C across the board. Just be aware that it's very noisy and powered by a plug socket. If you're in the UK, you'll also need an EU to UK plug adaptor for it to work.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/IETS-Powerful-Turbo-Fan-Infinitely-13-17-3inch/dp/B09FJBYQ7Y/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=iets+gt500&qid=1652281301&sprefix=iets,aps,271&sr=8-3
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hulkpro-European-Adapter-Toothbrush-Hairdryer/dp/B08S369FN9/ref=sr_1_3?crid=UEMAUDQ8VF5U&keywords=hulkpro+adapter&qid=1652281389&sprefix=hulkpro+,aps,152&sr=8-3

1) As for a guide, removing the screws on the bottom of the case can be done in no particular order. However, it is very important that you remove + re-add the heatsink screws in a specific order. They'll all have a number between 1-9. When removing the screws, start with 9 (middle screw) and end with 1. When re-seating the components, start with 1 and end with 9.
Note: Don't tighten the screws too much or you'll likely end up having them stripped like I unfortunately had to deal with earlier this year.

2) Once you've taken out the screws and need to remove the heatsink, do not pull them off from the pipes. You'll damage it from doing that. The best way is by pulling upwards gently from the black vents.

3) After removing the heatsink, the first task I usually do is applying thermal paste remover on both components + the heatsink itself and letting it do its thing for a minute. Once it's done, gently remove the paste with a paper towel. Then, apply the thermal paste purifier to the same parts for 60 seconds.

4) After this, I'd remove the fans from their place and begin cleaning them. Apply the purifier to a cotton bud and remove as much dust as possible. This part can be tedious and time-consuming, but it's definitely worth doing so.

5) Hold up the heatsink gently from both sides and blow into the black vents to remove dust from them. This part is thankfully fairly straightforward.

6) As for applying the thermal paste, I usually perform the X method on both components as this allows for a fairly even spread of the paste. It's nerve-wrecking at first, but you'll absolutely get used to it. I'd also repeat this task every 3-6 months depending on dust build-up in the fans + heatsink.

7) Once you've re-applied the paste, insert the screws in the correct order from 1-9. This allows the heatsink to have the best + even fit on the top of the components + allows the paste to spread. From memory, screws 1-4 are with the GPU side and screws 5-8 are on the CPU. Screw #9 is between both of them.

8) Re-attach the bottom case with the screws. I don't think it matters which order you do this in, just be sure to remember where each screw was originally placed.

9) Let the paste set for 10-20 minutes, then perform a stress test in Intel XTU. If your laptop is still overheating, I'd consider incrementally undervolting the CPU or re-doing the thermal paste process again. A lot of the time, it's completely trial and error so even someone like myself who has done this 50+ times can still get it wrong.

10) Last pieces of advice would be to turn on your fans to their full speed during gameplay. You do this by pushing Fn + 1 simultaneously. Also, (I'm sure you're doing this already) but make sure the air vents aren't blocked by having it on a blanket etc. You ideally want a cooling pad slightly upward to encourage air flow.

Hopefully this all helps, and good luck with the process!
Thanks so much for your detailed reply I will go through all this in depth. I already ordered just some cotton wool and isopropyl alcohol. Will this be enough if I get all the paste off then give it a clean with a fresh bud ?

For the cooling pad I may get one of these for gaming. I have been through about 4 different ones usb powered with my old laptop and all of them the fans just broke after a while. So now I just have the cooling tray below the laptop I have now but no fans on as that's better than having the vents covered on my lap.
 

barlew

MOST VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
Thanks so much for your detailed reply I will go through all this in depth. I already ordered just some cotton wool and isopropyl alcohol. Will this be enough if I get all the paste off then give it a clean with a fresh bud ?

For the cooling pad I may get one of these for gaming. I have been through about 4 different ones usb powered with my old laptop and all of them the fans just broke after a while. So now I just have the cooling tray below the laptop I have now but no fans on as that's better than having the vents covered on my lap.
That will do you fine for cleaning the old paste off.

When it comes to cooling stands my advice is dont get too hung up on fans. I've tried numerous cooling stands over the years, with and without fans, and my personal opinion is the biggest factor to cooling is the gap created under the laptop to let air circulate.

I have done loads of testing with my latest fan assisted cooling pad. The fans do not make a blind bit of difference. With the laptop on the stand, and the fans turned off temps are a few degrees cooler. If you turn the fans on temps stay exactly the same.
 

Jasontvnd

Bronze Level Poster
Honestly i would wonder what is going on in the background first and foremost , According to the screenshot you posted you are using 22.5GB of system with which is mightily excessive for running warzone even with alot of background stuff going on.

I wouldn't be overly concerned about the 9900k hitting thermal throttling as i'm sure scott will attest to even in a desktop with a good cooler it can be a bit of a toasty boy and its staying above its 3.6Ghz base clock and with CPU methadology for the last few generations has been to extract as much as they can out of a CPU with turbo boost and only backing off once it starts bouncing close to the TJmax or powerlimit.

As barlew alluded too earlier it does seem like your GPU is stuck in the lowest power state which could indicate a driver issue , a 9900k at 4.4Ghz at 65% usage in warzone is very very unusual unless you are getting super high framerates which seems unlikely being that your GPU is at 300Mhz.

Honestly if i was you i would try a complete reinstall of windows 11 from fresh because it seems like something strange is going on,
 

slippy88

Active member
I redid the thermal paste, there was a ton of dust not on the fans, but in the vents blocking it which probably explains the high temperatures and throttling. It was a problem warzone couldn't even run properly at all. It all works fine now and I've never seen the temperatures this low. When I removed the heatsink there was barely any paste on both the GPU and CPU, they must have done a very thin layer when I sent it in 3 years ago.

So now I have another query, it seems that on Control Center it is now running at 4.2 constantly, and the Turbo Max and Core base show N/A and 0. Before I think it showed what the actual maximum was like 5Mhz and there was a bar to show what it is on now. Now I just have the number and the pink bar is not showing.
 

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SpyderTracks

We love you Ukraine
Moderator
I redid the thermal paste, there was a ton of dust not on the fans, but in the vents blocking it which probably explains the high temperatures and throttling. It was a problem warzone couldn't even run properly at all. It all works fine now and I've never seen the temperatures this low. When I removed the heatsink there was barely any paste on both the GPU and CPU, they must have done a very thin layer when I sent it in 3 years ago.

So now I have another query, it seems that on Control Center it is now running at 4.2 constantly, and the Turbo Max and Core base show N/A and 0. Before I think it showed what the actual maximum was like 5Mhz and there was a bar to show what it is on now. Now I just have the number and the pink bar is not showing.
It may be worth checking www.clevo.com.tw for a Windows 11 or latest control center version.
 

DarkPaladin

Silver Level Poster
I redid the thermal paste, there was a ton of dust not on the fans, but in the vents blocking it which probably explains the high temperatures and throttling. It was a problem warzone couldn't even run properly at all. It all works fine now and I've never seen the temperatures this low. When I removed the heatsink there was barely any paste on both the GPU and CPU, they must have done a very thin layer when I sent it in 3 years ago.

So now I have another query, it seems that on Control Center it is now running at 4.2 constantly, and the Turbo Max and Core base show N/A and 0. Before I think it showed what the actual maximum was like 5Mhz and there was a bar to show what it is on now. Now I just have the number and the pink bar is not showing.
Glad it's working better for you now!

As for the other issues:
1) I personally would have the stress test running for 10-20 minutes. As long as the CPU doesn't get too hot or display any throttling issues, then you should be good to go.

2) From my experience, Control Centre has never been too reliable for me and it usually heats up my system just by running it. But (as SpyderTracks suggested) I'd recommend looking around for a potential software update if it's a concern for you.

Clevo Website: https://www.clevo.com.tw/clevo_down.asp?lang=en
Model: P7xxTM_P7xxTM1_P7xxTM-G_P7xxTM1-G
Driver: Optional
Latest Control Centre Driver says 2019/09/24: https://www.clevo.com.tw/en/e-services/download/ftpout_download.asp?sno=11590&no=3

3) If your CPU is constantly operating at its maximum frequency, you either have software running in the background (anti-virus scan) or your battery power plan is set to "prefer maximum performance". This setting has your CPU running at its best frequency 24/7, which isn't necessary unless gaming. Look at the bottom-right corner of your screen, click the battery icon, then click the slider from "maximum performance" to "better performance" when you aren't gaming. The better performance setting adjusts your CPU frequency to adapt to the requirements of the system e.g. nothing demanding is in use has the CPU in a resting state vs running a game has it in higher frequencies.

4) I'd also look into updating the GPU drivers (as others have suggested) just to be sure nothing else is going wrong.
 

slippy88

Active member
I think I found the problem it was on "minimum processor state 100%"
I tried reinstalling Control Center with that link, still no pink bar showing, but I guess that is just visual anyway as long as it is showing the number I can see what's going on.
 

slippy88

Active member
It's still hovering around 4.2Ghz, maybe it is something to do with the settings on Control Center? Should it not be boosting to 4.2 for a few minutes before dropping down to around 3.5?

On the CPU VR limit what should this be ? Currently set at 1

I've turned of prefer maximum performance on Nvidia on a game. Is there another way to reduce this clockspeed without just doing battery saver mode , or setting maximum power to 99%?
 

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SpyderTracks

We love you Ukraine
Moderator
It's still hovering around 4.2Ghz, maybe it is something to do with the settings on Control Center? Should it not be boosting to 4.2 for a few minutes before dropping down to around 3.5?

On the CPU VR limit what should this be ? Currently set at 1

I've turned of prefer maximum performance on Nvidia on a game. Is there another way to reduce this clockspeed without just doing battery saver mode , or setting maximum power to 99%?
Why do you want to reduce performance? Thats kind of defeating the object of a good CPU.

3.5 is the base clock, it will only operate that low when there's little load.

Normal frequency is 4.6 with boosts to 5ghz

What's the issue you're having?
 
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