What are you driving at the moment? | Page 9 | PCSPECIALIST

What are you driving at the moment?

Stephen M

MOST VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
One thing you notice in an EV is the drop in mileage during the winter, about 20 miles a charge on the Hyundai.

For icey mornings it is great having it plugged in and running the air con from the app, windows clear and car warm when I get in.

This one is supposed to do 336 miles on a full charge so can do Stenhousemuir with only one stop if I want. As charging is £20 a year in Scotland it will be a tad cheaper than going by train.
 

Stephen M

MOST VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
A bit of learning curve as quite different to the Hyundai but got the important thing working, the sound system. Got a miniature 256 GB thumb drive, enough sounds on that for a few trips to Scotland and back.

If roads clear can do both legs before Wagner's Ring has finished.
 

Bigfoot

VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
One thing you notice in an EV is the drop in mileage during the winter, about 20 miles a charge on the Hyundai.

For icey mornings it is great having it plugged in and running the air con from the app, windows clear and car warm when I get in.

This one is supposed to do 336 miles on a full charge so can do Stenhousemuir with only one stop if I want. As charging is £20 a year in Scotland it will be a tad cheaper than going by train.
How close to that 336 mile range will you be happy to go? For me the lack of range and the time required to recharge is still a showstopper for EVs.

Also, winter in north east Scotland is dark and usually pretty cold, so range is likely to drop significantly.
 

Stephen M

MOST VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
How close to that 336 mile range will you be happy to go? For me the lack of range and the time required to recharge is still a showstopper for EVs.

Also, winter in north east Scotland is dark and usually pretty cold, so range is likely to drop significantly.
If pushed I would risk 310-320 in Summer and drop that by 20 miles in Winter, although will monitor it over next few months and may change.

Interestingly, some of the mileage increases are not battery but software related, so could see an increase as the ID.3 is still quite a new model. My Hyundai model increased by about 25 miles on a full charge in a year.

Having experienced quite a few Scottish Winters, some in the Summer, I would aim for a bit less, although not a lot less.
 

Martinr36

MOST VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
How close to that 336 mile range will you be happy to go? For me the lack of range and the time required to recharge is still a showstopper for EVs.

Also, winter in north east Scotland is dark and usually pretty cold, so range is likely to drop significantly.
And the lack of recharging infrastructure, which is why I think that self charging hybrids are the way to go
 

Stephen M

MOST VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
As both cars had the same registration, thought a picture of one coming the other going would be fun.

Marc.jpg
 

Stephen M

MOST VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
Had the ID.3 a couple of weeks now, not done a lot in it but impressed so far.

More comfortable than the Hyundai and better position for the HUD, which I find really handy when using Satnav but one stand out so far is charging.

As my house is on a loop system it is capped at 3.7 kWh, should be 7.4 for a standard home although will rarely reach that as other usage effects it. Best rate with Hyundai was 2.5 kWh while this is 3.2 and a bit more at times. It is enough to make a significant difference on full charge times. Will be interesting to see how it goes with a 50 kWh charger, if there is a similar increase it would give a 10-15 minute stop option for my Scotland trips.

Have chatted with other EV drivers and battery type and/or software does have quite an effect on charge times. Not an issue for me as am very rarely on a tight schedule these days but for business users it could be a major boon.
 

Hello Paul

Bronze Level Poster
My daily driver is a Lotus Elise S. I wish they (or Tesla) would make an electric version of it (like the original Tesla Roadster, not that silly $250,000 one they're bringing out) mainly so I don't feel bad when I do the occasional very short trip in cold weather, worrying about the wear and tear I'm putting on the engine running it for a short time, not even allowing it to warm up fully. A lightweight*, 2-seat sports car would be ideal for electrification; it feels so 20th-Century driving a petrol car, when an electric one should give similar performance without all the oily bits to go wrong.

*I know it'd be hard to keep the weight down on an electric car compared to an Elise which weighs ~930kg.
 

KriSta

Member
Don`t hold it against me , but I`m driving an Porsche Cayenne S 2005 model . Plenty of grunt from it`s 4.5L V8 and 340 HP is more than enough . It is a nice car , albeit thirsty and expensive to maintain . I had hopes to drive it offroad , but the pandemic in Ireland has made it kind of impossible . In hindsight I think the better pick would have been the Cayenne Turbo or Turbo S cosidering similar value 2nd hand .
 

ubuysa

The BSOD Doctor
Moderator
Don`t hold it against me , but I`m driving an Porsche Cayenne S 2005 model . Plenty of grunt from it`s 4.5L V8 and 340 HP is more than enough . It is a nice car , albeit thirsty and expensive to maintain . I had hopes to drive it offroad , but the pandemic in Ireland has made it kind of impossible . In hindsight I think the better pick would have been the Cayenne Turbo or Turbo S cosidering similar value 2nd hand .
Does it have a sticker in the rear window saying "my other car is a Lada"?? :ROFLMAO:
 

Bhuna50

MOST VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
My new car has finally arrived at the dealer and Im awaiting arrangement for PDI and delivery now.

Only a 7 months wait so far..
 
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