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Windows 11

Rakk

The Awesome
Moderator
Meanwhile I think I'll be waiting a bit anyways, the ancient game I always play has enough issues already (DirectX9 errors you say ......), and don't know if Win 11 will cause it any extra problems :)
 

ubuysa

The BSOD Doctor
Moderator
Meanwhile I think I'll be waiting a bit anyways, the ancient game I always play has enough issues already (DirectX9 errors you say ......), and don't know if Win 11 will cause it any extra problems :)
If you have 200GB or so spare on a drive then dual boot Windows 11 as a test. You could install the ancient game in there and see how it is?
 

ubuysa

The BSOD Doctor
Moderator
I don't know whether this is well known or not but I'm posting it here in case anyone else runs into it....

Windows 11 is designed to run with Core Isolation (HVCI) turned on (although it was off by default when I clean installed Windows 11 recently!) and one of the things it traps are drivers that don't meet the Microsoft HVCI requirements, Core Isolation won't allow you to install them.

I came across this issue just now when installing the AMD RAMdisk software on Windows 11. This comes with a third-party driver that isn't HVCI compatible, so on the face of it I couldn't run my RAMdisk. However, Core Isolation only stops you installing non-compliant drivers, it doesn't stop you running them(!). By turning Core Isolation off you can install the troublesome driver (having checked that it's legit and safe of course!) and then turn Core Isolation back on.

TBH that all sounds a bit daft to me, either a driver is compatible or it's not and if it's not then it should neither install NOR run.....
 

ubuysa

The BSOD Doctor
Moderator
FWIW I've gone back to Windows 10. I'm getting too many taskbar glitches (icons disappearing etc.), the cursor leaves an artefact on 5kPlayyer when it 'disappears', and a couple of other minor issues. Nothing that's a showstopper and I'm sure they'll get fixed, but I'm going to drop back for a month or so.

Later edit: It seems that Windows 11 contains a lot of taskbar changes and there are several reports from Insider builds of taskbar problems. It seems that some of them are still there.

Much later edit: Further to the taskbar issues I was noticing I've just read this (my underlining)....
In Windows 11, the taskbar has been modernized and it’s based on UWP (XAML), and it has been rewritten.
https://www.windowslatest.com/2021/...s-a-downgrade-but-itll-eventually-get-better/
 
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ubuysa

The BSOD Doctor
Moderator
WHAT THE......?!!

Although I'm not running Windows 11 in production I am checking after each patch Tuesday for updates for it. Whilst rummaging through system settings whilst it checked for updates I came across something that is dumber than the dumbest thing from the dumb place....

SMB 1.0 is ENABLED by default in Windows 11.

Words fail me. Microsoft themselves strongly recommend that it is removed, see here, and yet they ship their shiny new version of Windows with it enabled. [Expletives deleted]. 🤬
 

Martinr36

MOST VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
WHAT THE......?!!

Although I'm not running Windows 11 in production I am checking after each patch Tuesday for updates for it. Whilst rummaging through system settings whilst it checked for updates I came across something that is dumber than the dumbest thing from the dumb place....

SMB 1.0 is ENABLED by default in Windows 11.

Words fail me. Microsoft themselves strongly recommend that it is removed, see here, and yet they ship their shiny new version of Windows with it enabled. [Expletives deleted]. 🤬
Just checked the laptop and it's disabled
 

ubuysa

The BSOD Doctor
Moderator
Just checked the laptop and it's disabled
That's curious....?

Did you clean insta it or upgrade? With an upgrade I'd expect it to use whatever setting SMB 1.0 had in Windows 10. I did a fully clean install of Windows 11. Perhaps that's the difference?
 
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ubuysa

The BSOD Doctor
Moderator
Sorry, but what does SMB do in windows ?
SMB is the Small Message Block protocol, it's used in the main for file sharing systems using the Common Internet File System (CIFS). There are currently three versions of SMB (1.0, 2.0 and 3.0). SMB 1.0 was found as long ago as 2018 to contain a serious vulnerability that would allow an attacker to install malware on your PC, in 2019 Microsoft recommended that users disable SMB 1.0.
 
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