BSOD issues on new PC | Page 2 | PCSPECIALIST

BSOD issues on new PC

tbate

Member
That seems like a reasonable thing to do. While it sounds like it's not the RAM sticks, better to rule it out for certain with new sticks than send it back for weeks on an RMA for it to turn out to be a RAM stick failure, especially given the RMA wait times currently

Fair point, thanks.
 

tbate

Member
Well another new update, something that baffles my mind. I got it working. The very first combination call it Ram slot 1 paired with Ram stick 1 and it turned on, seemed to struggle a little but it's on. Ganna see if there is any dump files and send em over to PCS.
 

ubuysa

OMNIPOTENT
Moderator
Well another new update, something that baffles my mind. I got it working. The very first combination call it Ram slot 1 paired with Ram stick 1 and it turned on, seemed to struggle a little but it's on. Ganna see if there is any dump files and send em over to PCS.
Would you mind if I took a look as well?
 

ubuysa

OMNIPOTENT
Moderator
Both of those dumps are identical, they are both caused by a corrupted checksum when reading the hibernate file - these make three of these you've had now.

The Fast Startup feature uses hibernation, when you do a normal shutdown the Windows kernel is hibernated, making for a faster startup. With an SSD as your system drive you don't need fast startup, I don't know whether you normally hibernate your system? I would suggest that you disable hibernation completely (powercfg -h off) and see whether that makes a difference.

On the one hand these errors would point to the drive on which the hibernate file is located.

On an HDD it's in fixed unmovable locations and thus I'd suspect this area of the HDD - a chkdsk /r on the HDD will show if there are suspect sectors in this area of the disk.

Things are different on an SSD. As far as Windows is concerned the hibernate file is also in fixed and unmovable locations, but the wear levelling algorithms used by SSDs mean that it doesn't actually occupy the same fixed storage blocks on the drive. To cause these checksum errors then, the entire SSD would have to be suspect, in that case I'd be expecting many more errors and BSODs as other components use flaky blocks on the drive - and you're not seeing that. I don't think?

On the other hand you've had many BSODs that tend to point to RAM as the issue (the PTE errors for example) and the failed checksum could be caused by flaky RAM.

It is possible, though I hate coincidences, that you have two faulty components on your PC; the RAM and the SSD. Perhaps PCS might consider shipping you a replacement SSD for you to try as well as replacement RAM? That would involve another clean install of Windows of course but it would be worth the effort. Perhaps you might suggest it to PCS?
 

tbate

Member
Both of those dumps are identical, they are both caused by a corrupted checksum when reading the hibernate file - these make three of these you've had now.

The Fast Startup feature uses hibernation, when you do a normal shutdown the Windows kernel is hibernated, making for a faster startup. With an SSD as your system drive you don't need fast startup, I don't know whether you normally hibernate your system? I would suggest that you disable hibernation completely (powercfg -h off) and see whether that makes a difference.

On the one hand these errors would point to the drive on which the hibernate file is located.

On an HDD it's in fixed unmovable locations and thus I'd suspect this area of the HDD - a chkdsk /r on the HDD will show if there are suspect sectors in this area of the disk.

Things are different on an SSD. As far as Windows is concerned the hibernate file is also in fixed and unmovable locations, but the wear levelling algorithms used by SSDs mean that it doesn't actually occupy the same fixed storage blocks on the drive. To cause these checksum errors then, the entire SSD would have to be suspect, in that case I'd be expecting many more errors and BSODs as other components use flaky blocks on the drive - and you're not seeing that. I don't think?

On the other hand you've had many BSODs that tend to point to RAM as the issue (the PTE errors for example) and the failed checksum could be caused by flaky RAM.

It is possible, though I hate coincidences, that you have two faulty components on your PC; the RAM and the SSD. Perhaps PCS might consider shipping you a replacement SSD for you to try as well as replacement RAM? That would involve another clean install of Windows of course but it would be worth the effort. Perhaps you might suggest it to PCS?

Thanks for taking a look. That's allot of info to absorb, which means we are probably on the right track.

I don't typical sleep the PC, it will occasionally do so on it's own if I leave it alone for too long. But I generally do a full power off rather than sleep/hibernate mode.

I would expect that the files you mentioned have been put on the SSD as oppose to the HDD, i'll see if I can find out however.

I will disable Hibernate as suggested and I'll make your suggestion of a new SSD known to PCS.

You're an awesome help man, all this is very confusing to me. But comforting to know there are people who actually know what they're talking about looking at this :)
 

ubuysa

OMNIPOTENT
Moderator
Note that hiberfil.sys is a hidden file, so you'll have to enable the display of hidden files to see it.

TBH I would just turn hibernation off since from what you've said you don't use it. It will also save you a chunk of disk space equal to the size of your RAM.
 

tbate

Member
Note that hiberfil.sys is a hidden file, so you'll have to enable the display of hidden files to see it.

TBH I would just turn hibernation off since from what you've said you don't use it. It will also save you a chunk of disk space equal to the size of your RAM.
Will do TY
 

tbate

Member
Note that hiberfil.sys is a hidden file, so you'll have to enable the display of hidden files to see it.

TBH I would just turn hibernation off since from what you've said you don't use it. It will also save you a chunk of disk space equal to the size of your RAM.

So new Ram arrived today, so see how that goes. PCS looked at the dump files I sent over and asked me to run a sfc /scannow. Corrupt files were found and it says they're fixed. So now to turn Hibernate off and keep fingers crossed, if any problems occur now I at least know to bring up the SSD before taking it in.

Thank you for your help! and we'll see how it goes from here!
 
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