Installation and Set Up | PCSPECIALIST

Installation and Set Up

MikeD

Member
Can anyone enlighten me as to what the installation, set up and wifi consists of if taken as an option with a new build PC? Look forward to any comments, regards
Mike
 

SpyderTracks

Huntsman
Moderator
Can anyone enlighten me as to what the installation, set up and wifi consists of if taken as an option with a new build PC? Look forward to any comments, regards
Mike
Installation and setup is just that, they will send someone round to plug the power cable into the PC for you. Basically, you don't need it :)

Wifi is not standard on most builds, so you have to select a wifi card to get wifi connectivity. Ethernet is standard on all motherboards though, so if you're planning on using ethernet, then you likely don't need a wifi card.
 

MikeD

Member
Installation and setup is just that, they will send someone round to plug the power cable into the PC for you. Basically, you don't need it :)

Wifi is not standard on most builds, so you have to select a wifi card to get wifi connectivity. Ethernet is standard on all motherboards though, so if you're planning on using ethernet, then you likely don't need a wifi card.
Thanks for the speedy reply, when I order my replacement PC I shall endeavour to begin a long learning curve on how to reinstall everything all over again, regards
Mike
 

SpyderTracks

Huntsman
Moderator
Thanks for the speedy reply, when I order my replacement PC I shall endeavour to begin a long learning curve on how to reinstall everything all over again, regards
Mike
The PC itself comes fully built, you literally just have to plug it in.
 

ubuysa

Moderator
Moderator
The PC itself comes fully built, you literally just have to plug it in.
True, but assuming you buy it with Windows (and the OP should) the very first time it boots it will start the Windows Out Of Box Experience (OOBE). The OOBE asks you lots of questions, such as what language you want to use, what region you are in, the time and date, what userid(s) you want to use and which telemetry options you want enabled. This process can take 10 minutes or longer and you want to take your time with it too.

Once the OOBE has completed (and you only ever see it that very first time you boot a new PC) you will have a full Windows system running.

The only real advantage to having someone come and install it for you is in those very rare cases where there are problems, they don't happen very often but they do happen. Having someone there means that they will very quickly be able to either solve whatever problems arise or determine immediately whether it needs to go back to PCS. As I said, those kinds of things are extremely rare.
 

MikeD

Member
True, but assuming you buy it with Windows (and the OP should) the very first time it boots it will start the Windows Out Of Box Experience (OOBE). The OOBE asks you lots of questions, such as what language you want to use, what region you are in, the time and date, what userid(s) you want to use and which telemetry options you want enabled. This process can take 10 minutes or longer and you want to take your time with it too.

Once the OOBE has completed (and you only ever see it that very first time you boot a new PC) you will have a full Windows system running.

The only real advantage to having someone come and install it for you is in those very rare cases where there are problems, they don't happen very often but they do happen. Having someone there means that they will very quickly be able to either solve whatever problems arise or determine immediately whether it needs to go back to PCS. As I said, those kinds of things are extremely rare.
Thanks again for the advice, my next PC will be the third that I have bought from PCS, and on every occasion it seems to become more complex, I am really only jumping ship for the one main reason of Windows 7 support ending in January, though my PC will be 6 years old in that month and maybe is becoming a little out of date, having said that like my previous two PC's they have always worked seamlessly from the day I received them to the day that I finally retired them, I just hope that continues as I think that this could really be my last upgrade. Thank you again for taking the trouble to respond, regards, Mike
 

ubuysa

Moderator
Moderator
Thanks again for the advice, my next PC will be the third that I have bought from PCS, and on every occasion it seems to become more complex, I am really only jumping ship for the one main reason of Windows 7 support ending in January, though my PC will be 6 years old in that month and maybe is becoming a little out of date, having said that like my previous two PC's they have always worked seamlessly from the day I received them to the day that I finally retired them, I just hope that continues as I think that this could really be my last upgrade. Thank you again for taking the trouble to respond, regards, Mike
Actually they have become a lot simpler to setup over the years. :)

Although I wrote a bunch of stuff there it really is a case of switching one and for the first time following the instructions on the screen....
 

Oussebon

Moderator
Moderator
As above, when you get the new PC, it should be a case of plugging in a few cables to the outside of the box (power cable, monitor cable, keyboard, mouse + network cable if you're not using wifi + a power cable for the monitor if it's a new monitor!), press the On button, follow the prompts on the screen, and off you go.

It is not something I'd describe as worth paying £80 for, for the overwhelming majority of people.
 
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