Ubuntu installation is sluggish and prone to crashing on my new desktop

tomhosker

New member

The Situation​

I've recently bought a new desktop (Order Reference 1967978). These are the hardware specs:
  • Processor: Intel® Core™ i5 Six Core Processor i5-9400F (2.9GHz) 9MB Cache
  • Motherboard: ASUS® H310M-A R2.0: Micro-ATX, DDR4, LGA1151, USB 3.1, SATA 6GBs
  • Memory: 8GB Corsair VENGEANCE DDR4 2400MHz (1 x 8GB)
  • Graphics Card: 2GB NVIDIA GEFORCE GT 1030
  • Storage: 256GB PCS 2.5" SSD, SATA 6 Gb (500MB/R, 400MB/W)
  • Sound Card: ONBOARD 6 CHANNEL (5.1) HIGH DEF AUDIO (AS STANDARD)
  • Network Card: 10/100/1000 GIGABIT LAN PORT (Wi-Fi NOT INCLUDED)
  • Wireless Network Card: WIRELESS 802.11N 300Mbps/2.4GHz PCI-E CARD
  • USB: MIN. 2 x USB 3.0 & 2 x USB 2.0 PORTS @ BACK PANEL + MIN. 2 FRONT PORTS
The machine came with Windows pre-installed, and that OS seems to work as expected. I'm trying to produce a dual-boot desktop, with around 50 GB allocated to Ubuntu, and the rest to Windows.

The Problem​

I'm trying to install Ubuntu 20.04 LTS via a bootable USB. This is something I've done successfully on a number of laptops and tablets, without running into any significant problems. But now I seem to be in a whole heap of trouble! More specifically:
  • The installation interface is really slow. Even selecting "English (UK)" from the drop-down menu can take 30 seconds.
  • The installation interface often freezes at a variety of stages, and will not unfreeze despite being given several hours to sort itself out.
  • If I'm lucky and/or patient enough to complete the installation, Ubuntu seems to work as expected. However, things then go wrong in the following way:
    • Following that first boot, the system will rapidly slow down and then freeze after about 10-15 minutes of use.
    • Every subsequent boot fails, freezing after spamming me with lots of 'PCIe Bus Error: severity=Corrected' messages.

Things I've Already Tried​

  • Re-installing Ubuntu.
  • Adding boot parameters as suggested on this page - no noticeable effect.
  • Installing a different Linux distribution - I tried installing Xubuntu, only to run into more or less the same problems.
 

Stephen M

MOST VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
Problem could be Nvidia drivers.

Would suggest installing in "safe graphic" mode. If already installed just switch to Nouveau X.org driver in settings.

Have had a few problems with Ubuntu over last year, mainly use Manjaro now, that is Arch-based but without the hassle of the main Arch. Again go with non-propriatory drivers.

If you have time it would be interesting to see how Manjaro goes for you. My newest machine, an AMD Nova laptop rushed through full installation in seven minutes.
 

Stephen M

MOST VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
Further to above. Have had strange driver behaviour with Nvidia and Ubuntu for years, another odd one is a log-in loop, keep returning to main screen.

That is solved by opening a ptty terminal, then purging the Nvidia drivers.

Have also found trying different drivers can help, it is not always the newest that work. On phone now and do not have the info but you can get a string of Nvidia drivers via a repository and using the Terminal. Unfortunately after that it is try each in turn until one works, although as X.org fine now would stick with that.
 

tomhosker

New member
Hi, @Stephen M. Thank you for getting back to me so quickly. A few things I need to share with you:
  1. I forgot to mention that I'd already tried installing Ubuntu in safe graphics mode, but it didn't seem to be any better.
  2. I've tried installing Manjaro as you suggested, using these steps in particular. However, as soon as I tried to boot from the new USB, I got bright red box with a message beginning: 'Secure Boot Violation: The system found unauthorized changes on the on the firmware, operating system or UEFI drivers.' It still boots to Windows normally, however.
  3. I'm currently installing Mint, but I'd be grateful for any wisdom you have to offer in the meantime.
 

Stephen M

MOST VALUED CONTRIBUTOR
Hi, @Stephen M. Thank you for getting back to me so quickly. A few things I need to share with you:
  1. I forgot to mention that I'd already tried installing Ubuntu in safe graphics mode, but it didn't seem to be any better.
  2. I've tried installing Manjaro as you suggested, using these steps in particular. However, as soon as I tried to boot from the new USB, I got bright red box with a message beginning: 'Secure Boot Violation: The system found unauthorized changes on the on the firmware, operating system or UEFI drivers.' It still boots to Windows normally, however.
  3. I'm currently installing Mint, but I'd be grateful for any wisdom you have to offer in the meantime.
I have had that Manjaro error in the past. This time I download the iso from the Manjaro site and then wrote it to the USB using the Ubuntu disc writer (may have got name wrong as never remember but is one of disc image tools). Not sure if that will make a difference.

Otherwise there is a Windows tool called Rufus for making isos, although never used it so cannot be sure it works with 'nix distros.
 

Pengwyn44

Member

The Situation​

I've recently bought a new desktop (Order Reference 1967978). These are the hardware specs:
  • Processor: Intel® Core™ i5 Six Core Processor i5-9400F (2.9GHz) 9MB Cache
  • Motherboard: ASUS® H310M-A R2.0: Micro-ATX, DDR4, LGA1151, USB 3.1, SATA 6GBs
  • Memory: 8GB Corsair VENGEANCE DDR4 2400MHz (1 x 8GB)
  • Graphics Card: 2GB NVIDIA GEFORCE GT 1030
  • Storage: 256GB PCS 2.5" SSD, SATA 6 Gb (500MB/R, 400MB/W)
  • Sound Card: ONBOARD 6 CHANNEL (5.1) HIGH DEF AUDIO (AS STANDARD)
  • Network Card: 10/100/1000 GIGABIT LAN PORT (Wi-Fi NOT INCLUDED)
  • Wireless Network Card: WIRELESS 802.11N 300Mbps/2.4GHz PCI-E CARD
  • USB: MIN. 2 x USB 3.0 & 2 x USB 2.0 PORTS @ BACK PANEL + MIN. 2 FRONT PORTS
The machine came with Windows pre-installed, and that OS seems to work as expected. I'm trying to produce a dual-boot desktop, with around 50 GB allocated to Ubuntu, and the rest to Windows.

The Problem​

I'm trying to install Ubuntu 20.04 LTS via a bootable USB. This is something I've done successfully on a number of laptops and tablets, without running into any significant problems. But now I seem to be in a whole heap of trouble! More specifically:
  • The installation interface is really slow. Even selecting "English (UK)" from the drop-down menu can take 30 seconds.
  • The installation interface often freezes at a variety of stages, and will not unfreeze despite being given several hours to sort itself out.
  • If I'm lucky and/or patient enough to complete the installation, Ubuntu seems to work as expected. However, things then go wrong in the following way:
    • Following that first boot, the system will rapidly slow down and then freeze after about 10-15 minutes of use.
    • Every subsequent boot fails, freezing after spamming me with lots of 'PCIe Bus Error: severity=Corrected' messages.

Things I've Already Tried​

  • Re-installing Ubuntu.
  • Adding boot parameters as suggested on this page - no noticeable effect.
  • Installing a different Linux distribution - I tried installing Xubuntu, only to run into more or less the same problems.
I have had the same experience. The error message is "PCIe Bus error device [8086:a295}. PCSpecialist unable to advise. If you do get Ubuntu to run, the error messages are recorded in a log file which if left unattended will evntually fill your drive and crash the computer.
I will look at the comments here, but have been advised that the best solution is to load Windows 10 and run Ubuntu in Virtual Box. Windows 10 runs perfectly. The basic problem is that PCS produces computers to work with Windows 10 and that OS is basically different from all previous Windows operating Systems.
 

Pengwyn44

Member
I have found a simple answer that really works! It will not suit everyone. Remove the PCI wireless network card from the computer.
Connect your computer to your router with a cable. Mine was already connected in that way. I suspect that Linux does not have a driver for this particular card.
 
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