Local Delicacies

Bigfoot

Grand Master
I have lived in Scotland for over twenty years and found that there are a range of local delicacies that you may not be familiar with south of the border.

Deep fried Mars bars, supposedly invented a few miles south of Aberdeen. Also now supplemented by deep fried Bounty.

Pizza crunch - pizza folded in half, dipped in batter and deep fried

Glasgow salad- a bowl of chips

That’s a 3 course meal in reverse.

Chips with gravy or curry sauce - what is going on?

Skirlie (known by my wife as scurvy) - a delightful? combination of oats and fat, supposedly used in place of stuffing

Mince - brown, salty fluid inhabited by lumps of chewy gristle.

Irn Bru - sugar, sugar, dayglo orange food colouring and CO2
 

AgentCooper

At Least I Have Chicken
Moderator
Nice list on both counts! You've missed out an absolute belter, a Glasgow classic... 'the munchy box'.

Take a pizza, box it, add chips, kebab meat, onion rings, chicken tikka, and whatever else takes your fancy.

It's guaranteed to soak up at least eight of the fifteen pints of Tennant's you've swallied that evening.

5075157103_91c635a349_b.jpg
 

Bigfoot

Grand Master
Nice list on both counts! You've missed out an absolute belter, a Glasgow classic... 'the munchy box'.

Take a pizza, box it, add chips, kebab meat, onion rings, chicken tikka, and whatever else takes your fancy.

It's guaranteed to soak up at least eight of the fifteen pints of Tennant's you've swallied that evening.

View attachment 23471
I live in rural Aberdeenshire and we don’t get all the big city innovations here 😀
 

SpyderTracks

We love you Ukraine
On the other hand we also have the following.

Aberdeen Angus steak
Venison (venison from Rona cannot be beaten)
Stornaway black pudding
Hand dived scallops
Langoustines
Hot and cold smoked salmon
Cullen skink
Single malt whisky

We also have any excellent local butchers.
What’s Cullen skink? Is it a fish?
 

Bigfoot

Grand Master
I forgot haggis. Haggis, neeps and tatties on Burns Night with a wee dram needs to be experienced. It does need a proper Scotsman to perform the address to the haggis.

We also have shortbread (only eat the all butter version) and tablet (similar to fudge, but different texture) and of course Tunnocks and authentic marmalade from Dundee.
 

SpyderTracks

We love you Ukraine
I forgot haggis. Haggis, neeps and tatties on Burns Night with a wee dram needs to be experienced. It does need a proper Scotsman to perform the address to the haggis.

We also have shortbread (only eat the all butter version) and tablet (similar to fudge, but different texture) and of course Tunnocks and authentic marmalade from Dundee.
We order a MacSweens Haggis every year, which I'm led to believe are very good: https://www.macsween.co.uk/products/delicious-every-day-haggis/

I'd still love to try a really authentic haggis though, I'm sure it's vastly better.
 

Bigfoot

Grand Master
We order a MacSweens Haggis every year, which I'm led to believe are very good: https://www.macsween.co.uk/products/delicious-every-day-haggis/

I'd still love to try a really authentic haggis though, I'm sure it's vastly better.
As an Englishman, I find Macsweens’ haggis perfectly acceptable, though I am sure those made by specialist small butchers will be better.

There are actually 2 basic types of mountain haggis: clockwise and anti clockwise. The clockwise haggis has left legs much longer than its right legs. This helps it negotiate mountain peaks in a clockwise direction. You can probably guess the anatomy of the other version. According to a Glaswegian former work colleague, haggis are also the origin of tartan. Haggis from different glens have different colours and patterns in their fur. The local clans used their skins to make kilts and tartan was born. Nowadays haggis are too rare to use their pelts for clothing.
 

AgentCooper

At Least I Have Chicken
Moderator
I forgot haggis. Haggis, neeps and tatties on Burns Night with a wee dram needs to be experienced. It does need a proper Scotsman to perform the address to the haggis.
I spawned and lived in Lancashire most of my young life but my family are Scots and I was born on the 25th of January. I had many a birthday not understanding what the hell was going on and why they insisted on feeding me the same meal every year. Apparently Robert Burns was more important than their infant son 🤨

Fortunately, I grew to appreciate it!
 

Stephen M

Author Level
Cullen skink is something I always try to have at least once on trips to Scotland, always been frightened of trying a tinned version down here.

Usually bring a few Haggis back with me, Brown's butchers in Stenhousemuir do a good one, although there seem to be good butchers in most Scottish towns.

Not sure if this is a West Country thing but faggots are great as well, a sort of haggis but without the oatmeal. They have to come from a proper butcher, once tried supermarket ones, Brains, they were disgusting, basically stale bread and sawdust bound with glue.

Lorne sausage is great as well and there are some good varieties, especially with a black pudding centre.
 

ActuallyDenz

Lord of Steam
Nice list on both counts! You've missed out an absolute belter, a Glasgow classic... 'the munchy box'.

Take a pizza, box it, add chips, kebab meat, onion rings, chicken tikka, and whatever else takes your fancy.

It's guaranteed to soak up at least eight of the fifteen pints of Tennant's you've swallied that evening.

View attachment 23471
A heart attack in a box - still probably worth it though!
 

Stephen M

Author Level
My old pub in Stenny had a fire exit door immediately opposite the local takeaway, there used to be a regular stream of munchy boxes coming through it just before a lock in.

A friend tried his luck in a Birmingham butchers once and was pleasantly surprised. He asked for some Glasgow Caviar and the butcher smiled and gave him a pound of mince.
 

Stephen M

Author Level
Pie and Bovril is a must at football but if you get lucky there may be Stovies on offer as well. One of the best is in the clubhouse at Peterhead FC.
 
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