Warranty When Overclocking! | Page 3 | PCSPECIALIST

Warranty When Overclocking!

debiruman665

Enthusiast
Actually in some cases it doesn't make sense to not replace a component broken because of overclocking though not many companies have caught on yet.

Consider Intel. It offers a whole bunch of CPUs and many it is possible to get a lot more performance out of them by overclocking without breaking them at least for as long as a computer-enthusiast tends to keep them. Most of these are reasonably priced.

Intel also offers "extreme" edition processors that are obscenely expensive (+/-$1000.00 USD) that are unlocked (meaning easier to overclock) and have slightly higher stock clock speeds but otherwise aren't much different than the cheap CPUs ($200-$300 USD). In fact you can OC your cheap CPU and make it a lot faster than the good one.

I buy the extreme because I love overclocking and I have an obscenely intricate self-built water cooling system, etc and I want the unlocked multiplier (that's what makes it easier to overclock) and the extra cache and cores. Not may people buy these however --
most people can coax the same performance for gaming (or close) on a cpu that is 1/4 the price.

So -- how to coax more people to buy the $1,000.00 (other than marketing hype)?

Replace burnt out overclocked ones at cost and a small administrative fee. These chips -- the $1,000.00 and the $200.00 ones cost about the same to produce. In fact, most of the costs are in R&D and testing -- there is not much cost AT ALL in producing individual chips. It's like copying a music cd (well, more expensive, but the analogy works -- it's still way more expensive to get the music than to reproduce once you have it).

I can almost guarantee that A LOT more people would buy the $1000.00 cpu if when they broke it by OCing they could just send it back to intel along with a receipt and a check for $X where $x represents the marginal cost of production + shipping and handling. Intel would actually make a lot of money from this.

A company that DOES do this is EVGA. You can overclock their graphics cards (they even post guides and give software helping you to do it). If you break it by overclocking, you send it back and you get a new one. The only way you void your warranty is visible physical damage. (So 1-- don't hit it with a hammer or 2-- apply so much voltage to it that it catches fire) And that's why I pay more for EVGA graphics cards when I could get the same thing elsewhere for less. Intel would be wise to follow suit.

This is only part of the story,

A lot of the chips in the same generation and architecture are actually all exactly the same printed die. With not all silicon being equal, the ones that don't pass the test have certain features disabled or are locked at lower clock speed. The lower priced chips are just the low end of the silicon lottery.
 

Orpheus

Active member
I've been asking PCSpecialist France about warranty, and this is their answer :

"Les utilisations telles que l’undervolting et l’overclocking n’annulent pas forcement la garantie s’il ne provoque pas des problèmes, mais si vous endommagez la machine en faisant de l’overclocking par exemple, cela annulerait la garantie. Pareil pour l’application d’une nouvelle pate thermique."

which translates to :
"Usages such as undervolting and overclocking don't necessarily void warranty if they don't cause damage, but if you damage the machine while overclocking for example, that would void your warranty. Same goes for the application of a new thermal paste".

So, undervolting and overclocking both CPU and GPU are ALLOWED as long as they don't cause any damage ?
To me it sounds like answering a question with both yes and no.
If you sell a machine with components designed for that kind of usage, why isn't it covered by warranty ?
I mean, it's quite hard to fry something with OC if you know what you're doing (and even if you don't I'm not even sure you would unless you're really trying to).
 

Scott

Behold The Ford Mondeo
Moderator
I would reply to the response and clarify that this refers to both CPU and GPU. If they reply yes then it's open season :D
 

Orpheus

Active member
You're right, I just did that now.
I'll update this thread when they answer back :)
Don't you find that a little bit weird ? Or am I the only one here ?
 

Orpheus

Active member
An update for people still wondering about this issue, they answered back with :

"Oui il s’agit bien de l’overclocking / undervolting du CPU et GPU. Par contre, si vous utilisez un BIOS sur mesure pour overclocker votre GPU cela annulerait votre garantie. "

"Yes, this refers to overclocking/undervolting both CPU and GPU. That being said, if you use a custom BIOS to overclock your GPU, it would void your warranty".

So I guess OC/UV on both components is allowed, as long as you don't fry them you won't have any issue with warranty.
It's kind of a slippery slope but I guess that's how it is. Though like I said earlier, I doubt you would fry something with a mild UV/OC, especially if you know what you're doing, if you don't, I'd recommend watching a few tutorials on Youtube, there's a lot of good ones (Bob of all trades is one of them).

Hope that helped.
 

Scott

Behold The Ford Mondeo
Moderator
That's really great, I hope their T&Cs get an update to show this too as it's a refreshing change.

The BIOS statement is absolutely fine, as with the BIOS of the motherboard, and quite correct to retain a warranty with just about any re-seller.
 

Orpheus

Active member
It is definitely a good thing, and I was honestly surprised to see it wasn't allowed for the GPU for some reason.. but I didn't see this was back in 2011 ! 😂
 

WhatCanIKeep?

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Hi Guys,

I am sorry for the delay in replying to this post, I was just double-checking couple of points with our R&D Manager. As it stands, any overclocking in any capacity voids the warranty on the GPU.

When you overclock a PC you will not void your warranty unless the PC fails as a result of the overclock. If you overclock your CPU and your hard drive breaks, we WILL cover this under warranty. If however you overclock your CPU and it breaks, we wont cover this under warranty.

The only overclocking permitted under warranty is the CPU. If you overclock your GPU your warranty will be void.

I have also updated our Team, I do apologise for any confusion caused.

Many Thanks,
Mustafa
 

Oussebon

Multiverse Poster
Hi Guys,

I am sorry for the delay in replying to this post, I was just double-checking couple of points with our R&D Manager. As it stands, any overclocking in any capacity voids the warranty on the GPU.



I have also updated our Team, I do apologise for any confusion caused.

Many Thanks,
Mustafa
Just to be clear, this applies to both desktops and laptops?
 
K

KRF

Guest
Hello all, so I am asking about about X.M.P and warranty I just ordered 32GB Corsair VENGEANCE DDR4 3000MHz (4 x 8GB) with a i9 9900k.

From what I understand DDR4 RAM is base 2133MHz and I need to enable X.M.P to get the speeds.

While reading websites trying to learn, it seems Intel will void warranty if you use X.M.P.

As I have ordered a PC from PC specilist, with 3000MHz RAM, will my warenty be voided?

Im not planning on over clocking the i9 9900k (3.6GHz) it was just £48 more than the 9900 at 3.1GHz and I had the cash, nor the GPU.

Thanks for any advice :)
 

SpyderTracks

Bingo Bango Orchestrator
Moderator
Hello all, so I am asking about about X.M.P and warranty I just ordered 32GB Corsair VENGEANCE DDR4 3000MHz (4 x 8GB) with a i9 9900k.

From what I understand DDR4 RAM is base 2133MHz and I need to enable X.M.P to get the speeds.

While reading websites trying to learn, it seems Intel will void warranty if you use X.M.P.

As I have ordered a PC from PC specilist, with 3000MHz RAM, will my warenty be voided?

Im not planning on over clocking the i9 9900k (3.6GHz) it was just £48 more than the 9900 at 3.1GHz and I had the cash, nor the GPU.

Thanks for any advice :)
No, XMP is not classed as overclocking by PCS or any other OEM, it's only Intel that will uphold that rediculous thing. Your warranty will be fully intact and PCS should apply the XMP so there will be nothing you need to do.
 
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K

KRF

Guest
No, XMP is not classed as overclocking by PCS or any other OEM, it's only Intel that will uphold that rediculous thing. Your warranty will be fully intact and PCS should apply the XMP so there will be nothing you need to do.

Thank you very much for the help, I know somethings about computers, but when it gets to legal things liek warrenty, I dont really have a clue, thanks again :)
 

SpyderTracks

Bingo Bango Orchestrator
Moderator
Thank you very much for the help, I know somethings about computers, but when it gets to legal things liek warrenty, I dont really have a clue, thanks again :)
PCS warranty is quite unusual in the fact that they will allow you to open the build and make any upgrades or maintenance steps like repasting as you like, so long as you don't cause any damage during that upgrade, your warranty is still completely intact. They're very good, that was one of the main reasons I chose them.
 

Wildnomad

Active member
Regarding warranty on overclocking, this thread is here to clear up any confusion, and set the mind at rest.

When you overclock a PC you will not void your warranty unless the PC fails as a result of the overclock. If you overclock your CPU and your hard drive breaks, we WILL cover this under warranty. If however you overclock your CPU and it breaks, we wont cover this under warranty.

The only overclocking permitted under warranty is the CPU. If you overclock your GPU your warranty will be void.

Before even considering overclocking you need to ensure the following:

1. You have a good enough CPU fan. We recommend the Titan Fenrir or CoolIT Eco.

2. You have good quality CPU paste.

3. Your PSU can handle the wattage required.

4. You have a good enough case that can provide sufficient airflow.

Finally, you will need to know the correct settings for your BIOS. Save your BIOS as a profile before proceeding so that if anything goes wrong you can return back to your original profile.

BEAR IN MIND THAT IF YOU OVERCLOCK YOUR COMPUTER INCORRECTLY YOUR COMPUTER WILL CRASH, BLUESCREEN OR POSSIBLY BREAK!
Hi there,

Just to be clear. Are these instructions for warranty only if the customer overclocks the processor? I'm assuming/hoping that the PCS overclocked systems are fully covered for all parts that may break through overclocking?
 
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