Warranty When Overclocking! | PCSPECIALIST

Warranty When Overclocking!

PCS

Administrator
Staff member
Regarding warranty on overclocking, this thread is here to clear up any confusion, and set the mind at rest.

When you overclock a PC you will not void your warranty unless the PC fails as a result of the overclock. If you overclock your CPU and your hard drive breaks, we WILL cover this under warranty. If however you overclock your CPU and it breaks, we wont cover this under warranty.

The only overclocking permitted under warranty is the CPU. If you overclock your GPU your warranty will be void.

Before even considering overclocking you need to ensure the following:

1. You have a good enough CPU fan. We recommend the Titan Fenrir or CoolIT Eco.

2. You have good quality CPU paste.

3. Your PSU can handle the wattage required.

4. You have a good enough case that can provide sufficient airflow.

Finally, you will need to know the correct settings for your BIOS. Save your BIOS as a profile before proceeding so that if anything goes wrong you can return back to your original profile.

BEAR IN MIND THAT IF YOU OVERCLOCK YOUR COMPUTER INCORRECTLY YOUR COMPUTER WILL CRASH, BLUESCREEN OR POSSIBLY BREAK!
 

Sleinous

Author Level
PCS, would it be possible for me to request the settings for your default 3.8Ghz overclock? I realise ill have to fiddle the settings a bit as every CPU is different :)
 

Sleinous

Author Level
i7 930.

Infact what I mean when I say voids warranty, is cpu warranty because if it is found to be an oc, that killed pc, then cpu wont be covered. Which is obvious because thats intel's warranty anyway so not sure why im still rambling :p
 

Tom DWC

Moderator
Moderator
Here's a point - say the PC is ordered pre-overclocked and then taken above the factory overclock level, does that void the warranty you get on the overclock?
 

MickyG

Enthusiast
I'd say it would, as you've went above the safe and stable levels that PCS have OC'd the components too. If it wasn't working before you Oc'd it then no, but if it was working fine and you did OC it more, and it broke then it would be your doing, therefore your fault

G
 

Tom DWC

Moderator
Moderator
I'd say it would, as you've went above the safe and stable levels that PCS have OC'd the components too. If it wasn't working before you Oc'd it then no, but if it was working fine and you did OC it more, and it broke then it would be your doing, therefore your fault.

Yeah that would make logical sense - just want to get the official verdict. :)
 

MickyG

Enthusiast
Yeah that would make logical sense - just want to get the official verdict. :)

Haha, yes, I wouldn't blame you. Always good to get official verdicts as sometimes what we can consider logical to us isn't necessarily logical to the company (generalisation by the way) :p

G
 

Fej

Bronze Level Poster
My i5 760 was clocked at 1.3ghz when i got it lmao, when stock should be 2.8ghz. Its at 2.8 now tho :p
 

MickyG

Enthusiast
My i5 760 was clocked at 1.3ghz when i got it lmao, when stock should be 2.8ghz. Its at 2.8 now tho :p

Hahaha, that's awesome :p I bet you had to look more than twice before believing it. Good thing is though you'll have had a nice speed boost, double what you where at which can't have been too bad eh :)

G
 

Fej

Bronze Level Poster
Hahaha, that's awesome :p I bet you had to look more than twice before believing it. Good thing is though you'll have had a nice speed boost, double what you where at which can't have been too bad eh :)

G

This. I was like EHHH? whats going on here then? ahaha ;)
 

MickyG

Enthusiast
This. I was like EHHH? whats going on here then? ahaha ;)

Hahaha :p

When mine arrives Saturday I'm going to double check everything now that you've said this :p
I'll have to post if my i7 960 3.2ghz comes with a clock speed of 1.6ghz :p Or the RAM is 512MB rather than 6GB :p

G
 

Nemesis

Moderator
Moderator
Lol just noticed this
I've been tellin people that you cant overclock under warranty but this rule is much nicer
Haha will be linking this now!!
probably just as well that i said not to for some people as they might've gone and overclocked without proper knowhow and landed in a mess
 
Last edited:

Grinder

Enthusiast
The warranty is irrelevant if nothing breaks anyway.
But if you fry your CPU then it won't be covered ?

So what you are saying is its ok to overclock your CPU as long as you don't break it lol
 

Darko

Well-known member
hey, can i have the overclocking settings for i7-950 for 3.8ghz? i cant find them in the website.
 

cpsusie

New member
Actually in some cases it doesn't make sense to not replace a component broken because of overclocking though not many companies have caught on yet.

Consider Intel. It offers a whole bunch of CPUs and many it is possible to get a lot more performance out of them by overclocking without breaking them at least for as long as a computer-enthusiast tends to keep them. Most of these are reasonably priced.

Intel also offers "extreme" edition processors that are obscenely expensive (+/-$1000.00 USD) that are unlocked (meaning easier to overclock) and have slightly higher stock clock speeds but otherwise aren't much different than the cheap CPUs ($200-$300 USD). In fact you can OC your cheap CPU and make it a lot faster than the good one.

I buy the extreme because I love overclocking and I have an obscenely intricate self-built water cooling system, etc and I want the unlocked multiplier (that's what makes it easier to overclock) and the extra cache and cores. Not may people buy these however --
most people can coax the same performance for gaming (or close) on a cpu that is 1/4 the price.

So -- how to coax more people to buy the $1,000.00 (other than marketing hype)?

Replace burnt out overclocked ones at cost and a small administrative fee. These chips -- the $1,000.00 and the $200.00 ones cost about the same to produce. In fact, most of the costs are in R&D and testing -- there is not much cost AT ALL in producing individual chips. It's like copying a music cd (well, more expensive, but the analogy works -- it's still way more expensive to get the music than to reproduce once you have it).

I can almost guarantee that A LOT more people would buy the $1000.00 cpu if when they broke it by OCing they could just send it back to intel along with a receipt and a check for $X where $x represents the marginal cost of production + shipping and handling. Intel would actually make a lot of money from this.

A company that DOES do this is EVGA. You can overclock their graphics cards (they even post guides and give software helping you to do it). If you break it by overclocking, you send it back and you get a new one. The only way you void your warranty is visible physical damage. (So 1-- don't hit it with a hammer or 2-- apply so much voltage to it that it catches fire) And that's why I pay more for EVGA graphics cards when I could get the same thing elsewhere for less. Intel would be wise to follow suit.
 
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